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Curriculum Plan

Performing Arts 

 

CURRICULUM PLAN 

 

The performing Arts curriculum aims to enable the students to be confident performers and speakers. Students are given the opportunity to work together as a team to plan, create and perform in front of an audience to realise a common goal. Performing Arts teaching also compliments the RE, PE and PSHE curriculum by discussing moral issues and opening debates on living the Gospel values.  

 

 

 

The National Curriculum 

We have not deviated from the National Curriculum in this subject. 

 

By the end of Key Stage 2 

 

Pupils have studied: 

  • How to be confident in the art of speaking. 

  • How to devise performing arts pieces by acting or choreographing dances. 

  • How to perform simple movement patterns using strength, technique, control and balance. 

  • How to evaluate their own and other performances. 

 

They can: 

  • Speak using appropriate registers for communication. 

  • Devise own performances for a range of audiences. 

  • Evaluate themselves and others. 

 

 

 

SUBJECT KEY CONCEPTS / COMPOSITES 

 

 

Key Stage 3 

 

Performing Arts Students study a broad range of performance skills including using facial expressions, body language and vocal expression to relay character and communication.  The following devices are used; Freeze frames, slow motion, thought tracking, physical theatre, mime, cross-cutting, nightmare sequences, choral speaking, unison, canon, mirroring, dynamic variation, levels, contact work, using a prop, using costume and ability to reproduce movement. 

 

 

Key Stage 4 

 

Performing Arts Students study a broad range of performance skills including using facial expressions, body language and vocal expression to relay character and communication.  The following devices are used; Freeze frames, slow motion, thought tracking, physical theatre, mime, cross-cutting, nightmare sequences, choral speaking, unison, canon, mirroring, dynamic variation, levels, contact work, using a prop, using costume and ability to reproduce movement. Understanding and evaluating professional works.  Understanding of job roles within the performing arts. 

 

 

 

 

CURRICULUM PLAN: KEY STAGE 3 

 

Year 7 

Year 8 

Year 9 

Knowledge 

Pupils will know: 

  • How to improvise, rehearse and perform a performance piece of their own imagination. 

  • How to perform a scripted piece or example of choreography. 

  • How to use their voices and bodies to effectively communicate meaning and character. 

  • Foundation drama techniques including and not exclusive to freeze frames, slow motion and thought tracking.  

  • How to evaluate their own and others performance to aid improvement. 

  • The year culminates in a KS3 promenade performance where they will showcase to parents either the dance or drama skills they have learnt. The students work together to achieve this momentous goal giving them a sense of pride, achievement and team spirit. 

 

We have chosen to teach this knowledge because it ensures that all students have the confidence to take part in small performances where they are able to start demonstrating skills they will need for further study. Students are also able to start evaluating their selves and others work so they can form an opinion. This prepares students for KS4.  

Pupils will know: 

  • How to improvise, rehearse and perform a performance piece of their own imagination, using a range of devices. 

  • How to perform a scripted piece or example of choreography to a range of audiences. 

  • How to use their voices and bodies to effectively communicate meaning and character. 

  • Students will study drama techniques and storytelling including and not exclusive to physical theatre and mime.  

  • How to evaluate their own and others performance to aid improvement and form an opinion. 

  • The year culminates in a KS3 promenade performance where they will showcase to parents either the dance or drama skills they have learnt. The students work together to achieve this momentous goal giving them a sense of pride, achievement and team spirit. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We have chosen to teach this knowledge because the skills they have learnt will aid them in further study of the subject. They are given further opportunities to perform for different audiences. They are able to use prior knowledge with the new skills to create a good performance piece. This prepares students for KS4 

Pupils will know: 

  • How to improvise, rehearse and perform a performance piece using Stanislavski’s “system.” 

  • Facts about Greek Theatre. 

  • How to devise a piece for Theatre in Education. 

  • How to perform a scripted piece or devised piece to a range of audiences with skill, control and accuracy. 

  • How to use their voices and bodies to effectively communicate meaning and character showing the use of intonation, tone, volume, mood, silence, stillness and action. 

  • Students will study more advanced drama techniques and storytelling including and not exclusive to cross-cutting, nightmare sequence and choral speaking.    

  • How to evaluate their own and others performance to aid improvement and communicate an effective argument of their opinion.  

  • The year culminates in a videoed performance of “Blackout.” There will be the opportunity to showcase to parents the performing art skills they have learnt. The students work together to achieve this momentous goal giving them a sense of pride, achievement and team spirit. 

 

 

We have chosen to teach this knowledge because the skills they have learnt will aid them in further study of the subject. They are given further opportunities to perform for different audiences. They are able to use prior knowledge with the new skills to create a good performance piece. This prepares students for KS4. 

Skills 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Demonstrate how to participate in a safe and productive rehearsal. 

  • Perform a scripted piece. 

  • Perform basic movement patterns. 

  • Devise own drama pieces using basic techniques. 

  • Evaluate their own and other performances using some performance vocabulary. 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Demonstrate how to participate in a safe and productive rehearsal. 

  • Perform a scripted piece effectively communicating meaning and character. 

  • Devise own drama pieces using techniques. 

  • Evaluate their own and other performances using performance vocabulary. 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Demonstrate how to participate, organise and improve work in a safe and productive rehearsal. 

  • Perform a scripted piece effectively communicating meaning and character. 

  • Devise own drama pieces using a range of techniques. 

  • Evaluate their own and other performances using performance vocabulary. 

Cultural Capital 

Pupils will all have been exposed to the concepts of performance skills from ideas by Stanislavski, Brecht, Dahl and Cunningham. The students will be exposed to different performance styles including musical theatre. This will be enhanced by the opportunity to attend a theatre trip.  This will help to aid a lifelong curiosity of the arts. 

 

This will enhance cultural capital because these practitioners influence a lot of current and previous performance works. Exposure to the arts shown on screen or via a theatre trip will help to aid a lifelong curiosity of the arts. 

Pupils will all have been exposed to the concepts of performance skills from ideas by Stanislavski, Brecht and Chaplin. The students will be exposed to different performance styles including mime and physical theatre. This will be enhanced by the opportunity to attend a theatre trip.  This will help to aid a lifelong curiosity of the arts. 

 

 

 

 

 

This will enhance cultural capital because these practitioners influence a lot of current and previous performance works. Exposure to the arts shown on screen or via a theatre trip will help to aid a lifelong curiosity of the arts. Our learners will have experienced a wide range of theatre styles. 

Pupils will all have been exposed to the concepts of performance skills from ideas by Stanislavski, Brecht, Anderson and Shakespeare. The students will be exposed to different performance styles including mime, physical theatre and choral speaking. This will be enhanced by the opportunity to attend a theatre trip. This will help to aid a lifelong curiosity of the arts. 

 

 

 

 

 

This will enhance cultural capital because these practitioners influence a lot of current and previous performance works. Exposure to the arts shown on screen or via a theatre trip will help to aid a lifelong curiosity of the arts. Our learners will have experienced a wide range of theatre styles. Students will also understand the history of theatre. 

Assessment: 
Formative – classwork and homework. 

 

Summative – end of cycle assessments and end of year examination. 

Pupils will have been assessed on: 

  • Capacity to work as part of a team to rehearse and improve group work. 

  •  Ability to recreate simple movement patterns. 

  • Ability to perform communicating meaning and characterisation. 

  • Devise own performance pieces. 

  • Evaluation skills. 

 

By three summative assessments per cycle. Two are performance assessments and one is a written evaluation of the assessment performance piece. 

Pupils will have been assessed on: 

  • Capacity to work as part of a team to rehearse and improve group work. 

  • Ability to perform communicating meaning and characterisation. 

  • Devise own performance pieces. 

  • Evaluation skills. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By three summative assessments per cycle. Two are performance assessments and one is a written evaluation of the assessment performance piece. 

Pupils will have been assessed on: 

  • Capacity to work as part of a team to rehearse and improve group work. 

  • Ability to perform communicating meaning and characterisation. 

  • Devise own performance pieces. 

  • Evaluation skills. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By three summative assessments per cycle. Two are performance assessments and one is a written evaluation of the assessment performance piece. 

 

CURRICULUM PLAN: KEY STAGE 4 

 

Year 10 

Year 11 

Knowledge 

Pupils will know: 

  • Basic theatre conventions. 

  • Job roles and responsibilities in the performance arts. 

  • Different genres and styles of the performing arts. 

  • Performance skills required to perform in a naturalistic style. 

  • Performance skills needed to perform the genre of epic theatre. 

  • Various dramatic devices including freeze frames, slow motion, thought tracking, cross-cutting, angel and devil, dream sequence, flash forward, flashback, physical theatre, mime, improvisation, contact work and monologue. 

  • The main themes of “Blood Brothers.” 

  • The main themes of “An Inspector Calls.” 

  • How to devise and structure a role play. 

  • How to evaluate and discuss a live piece of theatre. 

  • How to put on a performance for an outside audience. 

  • How to document and evaluate their own performance and improvements. 

 

We have chosen to teach this knowledge because to complete component 1 and 2 of Edexcel GCSE Drama, students are assessed on their ability to devise a play and analyse/evaluate the process.  They need to perform a scripted performance showing understanding of dramatic techniques and creative intentions of the excerpt.  

Pupils will know: 

  • How to use multiple stimuli to create performance work. 

  • The steps required to answer an exam brief including, planning, milestones and evaluation of the process. 

  • Various dramatic devices including freeze frames, slow motion, thought tracking, cross-cutting, angel and devil, dream sequence, flash forward, flashback, physical theatre, mime, improvisation, contact work, dance, monologue. 

  • How to prepare for a live performance.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

We have chosen to teach this knowledge because these skills are needed to complete the external exam of component three.  These skills will also assist students to continue to level three courses.  They will also fully prepare the students for a career in the performing arts industry. 

Skills 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Perform different genres of performance. 

  • Record and evaluate their progress. 

  • Use physical, vocal and facial expressions. 

  • Learn and perform sections of script. 

  • Block performances. 

  • Create their own devised pieces. 

  • Analise/evaluate the creative process. 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Perform various dramatic devices including freeze frames, slow motion, thought tracking, cross-cutting, angel and devil, dream sequence, flash forward, flashback, physical theatre, mime, improvisation, contact work, dance, monologue. 

  • Perform all three written tasks for component three which include planning for a performance, evaluating the process halfway through and evaluating the finished product. 

  • Create a performance work based on an exam brief. 

Cultural Capital 

Pupils will all have been exposed to the ideas of Willy Russell, J.B. Prriestly, Stanislavski, Brecht and  Frantic Assembly.  They will study the professional works of J.B.Priestly and Willy Russell. 

 

 

 

 

This will enhance cultural capital because they will have been exposed to different genres of theatre and classical professional works that still inspire creators, performers and audience members around the world.  It will expose the students to a whole industry that is often overlooked by other curriculum areas.  

Pupils will all have been exposed to the ideas of Stanislavski, Brecht, Frantic Assembly and Davy Anderson.  They will study the professional works of Liddy Oldroyd, Willy Russell and Mark Wheeller. 

 

This will enhance cultural capital because they will have been exposed to different genres of theatre and classical professional works that still inspire creators, performers and audience members around the world.  It will expose the students to a whole industry that is often overlooked by other curriculum areas. composites]: 

Assessment: 
Formative – classwork and homework. 

Summative – end of cycle assessments and end of year examination

Pupils will have been assessed on: 

  • A physical theatre devised piece. 

  • Performance of “Blood Brothers.” 

  • Live theatre Mock Exam. 

  • Understanding of “An Inspector Calls” Mock Exam. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This work will be internally assessed apart from the scripted performance of “Blood Brothers” where a guest teacher from another centre is moderating. 

Pupils will have been assessed on: 

  • Component 3 Activity 1 – Ideas Log. 

  • Component 3 Activity 2 – Skills Audit 

  • Component 3 Activity 3 – Performance of exam work. 

  • Component 3 Activity 4 – Evaluation Log 

 

This component is externally assessed by BTEC. Class teachers are not allowed to formally assess this work but they will be ensuring that all students adhere to the given deadlines. 

 

YEAR GROUP PLANS 

Year 7 

Cycle 1 

Introduction to Drama 

Cycle 2 

Musical Theatre 

Cycle 3 

Devising Plays 1 

Cycle 4 

Promenade Performance 

Pupils will know: 

  • The rules for a safe performing arts lesson. 

  • How to perform basic dramatic devices well. 

  • What a good rehearsal looks like. 

  • How to communicate meaning through physical, facial and vocal expression. 

  • How to be a respectful audience member. 

  • How to evaluate a performance to aid improvement. 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Perform/explain what makes a good freeze frame. 

  • Perform/explain how to perform slow motion. 

  • Preform/explain thought tracking. 

  • Perform/explain marking the moment. 

  • Explain what solo thinking is. 

  • Devise short role plays. 

  • Explain briefly what is good about a performance and how it could be improved. 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to the ideas of Stanislavski and Brecht and read a text from Roald Dahl. This will enhance cultural capital by exposing the students to modern theatre techniques that are widely used and will introduce them to the great literary works of Dahl.  

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their ability to rehearse, perform and evaluate themselves by taking part in two practical assessments and a written evaluation. 

Pupils will know: 

  • What is musical theatre? 

  • How to perform a musical theatre piece focussing on drama and dance. 

  • Taking on a director role whilst rehearsing. 

  • How to communicate meaning through physical, facial and vocal expression. 

  • How to use an item of set. 

  • Scripted lines from “Grease” off by heart. 

  • A short piece of choreography accurately.  

  • How to be a respectful audience member. 

  • How to evaluate a performance to aid improvement. 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Perform/explain what musical theatre is. 

  • Perform showing characterisation through the mediums of drama and dance. 

  • Devise an appropriate ending to the scene. 

  • Explain what is good about a performance and how it could be improved. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to the script and score of “Grease.” They will also watch sections of it. This will enhance cultural capital by exposing the students to musical theatre which is loved by many.  There will be an opportunity to watch a musical theatre piece at the local theatre. 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their ability to rehearse, perform and evaluate themselves by taking part in two practical assessments and a written evaluation. 

Pupils will know: 

  • The procedure for devising a play. 

  • How to use stimuli including but not limited to stories, Music, Pictures, Props and costumes. 

  • How to perform using freeze frames, slow motion, movement, thought tracking and monologue. 

  • How to create a multi scene performance piece with appropriate transitions.  

  • How to be a respectful audience member. 

  • How to evaluate a performance to aid improvement. 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Select appropriate dramatic devices. 

  • Use various stimuli to create ideas for performance. 

  • Perform showing characterisation through the medium of drama. 

  • Devise an appropriate storyline. 

  • Use transitions to show change of scenes. 

  • Explain what is good about a performance and how it could be improved. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to various stimuli including works of Art, literature and composed pieces. This will enhance cultural capital by exposing the students to various art forms which they will work with creatively. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their ability to devise, rehearse, perform and evaluate themselves by taking part in two practical assessments and a written evaluation 

Pupils will know: 

  • What is a promenade performance? 

  • A dance or excerpt of script off by heart. 

  • How to take on a director/choreographer role whilst rehearsing. 

  • How to communicate meaning through physical, facial and vocal expression. 

  • How to use a prop. 

  • How to evaluate a performance to aid improvement. 

  • The steps it takes to put on a performance to a paying audience. 

  • How to stay safe whilst an outside audience is invited. 

  • How to use different performances spaces and locations. 

  • How to work as a team to produce a finished product.  

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Perform/explain what is a promenade performance? 

  • Perform showing characterisation through the mediums of drama and dance. 

  • Behave professionally during a performance to an invited audience. 

  • Explain what is good about a performance and how it could be improved. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to a script and choreographic works of the Performing Arts Teams choice.  For example, this year’s promenade will be based on Shakespeare’s “The Tempest.”  This will enhance cultural capital by exposing the students to a play in a vocational context.  It will aid their cultural curiosity. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their ability to rehearse, perform and evaluate themselves by taking part in two practical assessments and a written evaluation 

 

 

Literacy 

Key terms: Freeze frame, slow motion, thought tracking, Marking the moment, solo thinking, Critical thinking 

 

 

 

 

 

Oral learning: Speaking showing tone, meaning and characterisation. 

 

Reading opportunities: Roald Dahl Revolting Rhymes. 

Literacy 

Key terms: Musical theatre, Characterisation, Facial expressions, vocal expressions, Body expressions, Gestures, Blocking, Rehearsal 

 

 

 

 

 

Oral learning: Speaking showing tone, meaning and characterisation.

 

 

 

Reading opportunities: “Grease” script. 

 

Literacy 

Key terms: Devise, Characterisation, Facial expressions, vocal expressions, Body expressions, Gestures, Blocking, Rehearse, Transitions, Freeze Frame, Slow Motion, Thought Tracking and Monologue. 

 

Oral learning: Speaking showing tone, meaning and characterisation.

 

 

 

Reading opportunities: Literacy stimuli. 

 

Literacy 

Key terms: Blocking, Director, Promenade performance, Swing, Choreographer, Props, Characterisation, Facial expressions, vocal expressions, Body expressions, Gestures, Rehearsal, Professionalism 

 

 

 

 

Oral learning: Speaking showing tone, meaning and characterisation.

 

 

 

 

Reading opportunities: Promenade play script.  

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: English – understanding text, tone, subtext, speaking communicating meaning, improvisation 

RE/PSHE - Mental health, Confidence, self-esteem, mental wellbeing and physical activity 

Music – articulation, rhythm, performance skills, expression, self-esteem, confidence, teamwork, communication 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: English – understanding text, tone, subtext, speaking communicating meaning, improvisation. Music – Dynamics, Rhythm, Crescendo, diminuendo. PE – reproducing simple movement patterns, choreographing own sequences. 

RE/PSHE - Mental health, Confidence, self-esteem, mental wellbeing and physical activity 

English – reading a script, inferring meaning. 

Music – articulation, rhythm, performance skills, expression, self-esteem, confidence, teamwork, communication 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: English – understanding text, tone, subtext, speaking communicating meaning, improvisation. Music – Dynamics, Rhythm, Crescendo, diminuendo. 

RE/PSHE - Mental health, Confidence, self-esteem, mental wellbeing and physical activity 

English – reading a script, inferring meaning. 

Music – articulation, rhythm, performance skills, expression, self-esteem, confidence, teamwork, communication 

 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: English – understanding text, tone, subtext, speaking communicating meaning, improvisation, Shakespeare. Music – Dynamics, Rhythm, Crescendo, diminuendo. PE – reproducing simple movement patterns, choreographing own sequences. History - cultural context of play 

 

RE/PSHE - Mental health, Confidence, self-esteem, mental wellbeing and physical activity 

Music – articulation, rhythm, performance skills, expression, self-esteem, confidence, teamwork, communication 

 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by rehearsal of performance piece and further reading of Roald Dahl’s “Revolting Rhymes.” 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by watching “Grease” and learning lines from script. 

 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by watching professional performance pieces and collating ideas to use in own work. 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by learning lines or choreography.  

Sequencing 

We have chosen this method of sequencing in Year 7 because we are ensuring that all students have the basic performance skills and ability to critically analysis performance works that will be needed throughout their performing arts education.  We have chosen performance pieces to study that we believe will enthuse the students and inspire a lifelong passion for the performing arts. 

It builds on the work done in Year 6 by increasing the level of difficulty of performance skills and giving the students more opportunities to perform to an audience.  The performing arts scheme of work is driven by the desire to be vocational and stimulating.  

It leads to the work that will be done in Year 8 by preparing them to be able to intelligently analyse their own and others work using theatre terms.  The students will have a foundation that will allow them to attempt more complex performance work and will enable them to have bigger roles in the promenade performance.  

 

YEAR GROUP PLANS 

Year 8 

Cycle 1 

Physical Theatre 

Cycle 2 

Page to Stage 

Cycle 3 

Mime and Expression 

Cycle 4 

Promenade Performance 

Pupils will know: 

  • How to create mood and atmosphere in a performance. 

  • Tell a narrative from memory. 

  • Know what physical theatre is. 

  • Understand how to perform using physical theatre. 

  • How to participate in team building activities. 

  • How to communicate meaning through physical, facial and vocal expression. 

  • How to be a respectful audience member. 

  • How to evaluate a performance to aid improvement. 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Perform/explain how to show mood and atmosphere in a performance. 

  • Perform/explain how to perform physical theatre. 

  • Devise short role plays that include physical theatre and characterisation. 

  • Explain briefly what is good about a performance and how it could be improved. 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to the ideas of Frantic Assembly and Brecht. This will enhance cultural capital by exposing the students to modern theatre techniques that are widely used.  

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their ability to rehearse, perform and evaluate themselves by taking part in two practical assessments and a written evaluation. 

Pupils will know: 

  • The processes required to start performing a play to the finalisation of the performance piece. 

  • Audition techniques. 

  • How to perform a character showing the directors intention including facial expressions, body language, vocal colour and characterisation. 

  • How to work as part of a team to achieve a common goal. 

  • How to evaluate own and others performance to aid improvement. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Perform a set study. 

  • Explain the process of putting on a show including casting, auditions, rehearsals, technical and dress rehearsals and final performance. 

  • Perform/explain how to be a good performer. 

  • Explain briefly what is good about a drama performance and how it could be improved. 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to the dramatic work “Annie.” 

This will enhance cultural capital by exposing the students to a new performance piece.  Students will also learn theatrical vocabulary. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their ability to rehearse, perform and evaluate themselves by taking part in two practical assessments and a written evaluation. 

 

Pupils will know: 

  • What is mime? 

  • They will be able to show/explain how to perform mime successfully. 

  • Taking on a director role whilst rehearsing. 

  • How to communicate meaning through exaggerated use of physical and facial expression. 

  • How to use an item of set/prop. 

  • History of mime. 

  • Information about Charlie Chaplin.  

  • What is comedy? 

  • How does comedic acting differ from naturalism?  

  • How to be a respectful audience member. 

  • How to evaluate a performance to aid improvement. 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Perform/explain what mime is. 

  • Perform showing characterisation and narrative without using the voice. 

  • Devise and perform a comic mime. 

  • Recall what is comedy and an example of a comedic practitioner. 

  • Explain what is good about a performance and how it could be improved. 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to the genre of comedy and mime. They will also watch examples of this. This will enhance cultural capital by exposing the students to a different genre of theatre which is loved by many. The student's physical expression will improve because they are unable to use their voice.  

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their ability to rehearse, perform and evaluate themselves by taking part in two practical assessments and a written evaluation. 

 

Pupils will know: 

  • What is a promenade performance? 

  • A dance or excerpt of script off by heart. 

  • How to take on a director/choreographer role whilst rehearsing. 

  • How to communicate meaning through physical, facial and vocal expression. 

  • How to use a prop. 

  • How to evaluate a performance to aid improvement. 

  • The steps it takes to put on a performance to a paying audience. 

  • How to stay safe whilst an outside audiences invited. 

  • How to use different performances spaces and locations. 

  • How to work as a team to produce a finished product.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Perform/explain what is a promenade performance? 

  • Perform showing characterisation through the mediums of drama and dance. 

  • Behave professionally during a performance to an invited audience. 

  • Explain what is good about a performance and how it could be improved. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to a script and choreographic works of the Performing Arts Teams choice.  For example, this year’s promenade will be based on Shakespeare’s “The Tempest.”  This will enhance cultural capital by exposing the students to a play in a vocational context.  It will aid their cultural curiosity. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their ability to rehearse, perform and evaluate themselves by taking part in two practical assessments and a written evaluation. 

 

 

Literacy 

Key terms: Freeze frame, slow motion, Physical Theatre, Mood and Atmosphere, Narrative, Improvisation. 

 

 

 

 

Oral learning: Speaking showing tone, meaning and characterisation.

 

Reading opportunities: Information about the Theatre group Frantic Assembly.

Literacy 

Key terms: Narrative dance, Contemporary Dance, Contact work, safety, Transitions, Dynamics, Levels, Unison, Canon, Critical thinking 

 

 

 

 

Oral learning: Speaking showing tone, meaning and characterisation.

 

 

Reading opportunities: Key terms and research about Christopher Bruce and Contemporary Dance. 

Literacy 

Key terms: Mime, Mood and Atmosphere, Characterisation, Facial expressions, Body expressions, Gestures, Rehearsal, Comedy, Slapstick 

 

 

 

Oral learning: Speaking showing tone, meaning and characterisation.

 

Reading opportunities: Research on Charlie Chaplin. 

Literacy 

Key terms: Blocking, Director, Greek Theatre, Sophocles, performance, Swing, Choreographer, Props, Characterisation, Facial expressions, vocal expressions, Body expressions, Gestures, Rehearsal, Choral Speaking, Professionalism, Theatre in Education. Objective, Given Circumstance, Focus, Emotion Memory 

 

Oral learning: Speaking showing tone, meaning and characterisation.

 

 

Reading opportunities: “Oedipus Rex,” “Blackout.” 

 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: Maths – Spatial awareness. English – storytelling and narrative. Music – creating mood and atmosphere. 

RE/PSHE - Mental health, Confidence, self-esteem, mental wellbeing and physical activity 

Maths- Spatial awareness/3D Shapes 

Music – articulation, rhythm, performance skills, expression, self-esteem, confidence, teamwork, communication 

 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: Music – Dynamics, Rhythm, Crescendo, diminuendo. PE – reproducing simple movement patterns, choreographing own sequences, contact work. Drama – communicating narrative and emotions through movement and facial expressions.  PSHE/RE - Human rights and equality. 

Maths – Spatial awareness (Y7/C4). Transformation of shapes (Y8/C1)  Timing/counting/Probability  

Music – articulation, rhythm, performance skills, expression, self-esteem, confidence, teamwork, communication 

MFL – Devising and performing role plays. 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: Dance – communicating meaning and emotions through movement. Use of music. History – history of film. 

E/PSHE - Mental health, Confidence, self-esteem, mental wellbeing and physical activity 

Music – articulation, rhythm, performance skills, expression, self-esteem, confidence, teamwork, communication 

MFL – Devising and performing role plays. 

 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: English – understanding text, tone, subtext, speaking communicating meaning, improvisation, Sophocles, Choral Speaking. Music – Dynamics, Rhythm, Crescendo, diminuendo. PE – reproducing simple movement patterns, choreographing own sequences. History - cultural context of play Greek theatre. 

Music – articulation, rhythm, performance skills, expression, self-esteem, confidence, teamwork, communication 

 

 

 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by rehearsal of performance piece and watching the performance works of Frantic Assembly. 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by rehearsal of performance piece and watching clips of Christopher Bruce’s performance works. 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by learning lines or choreography.  

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by learning lines or choreography. 

Sequencing 

We have chosen this method of sequencing in Year 8 because we are ensuring that all students have the basic performance skills and ability to critically analysis performance works that will be needed throughout their performing arts education.  We have chosen performance pieces to study that we believe will enthuse the students and inspire a lifelong passion for the performing arts. The skills learnt in Year 8 are more than complex than Year 7 and prepare the students for performing arts in KS4. 

It builds on the work done in Year 7 by increasing the level of difficulty of performance skills and giving the students more opportunities to perform to an audience.  The performing arts scheme of work is driven by the desire to be vocational and stimulating. The students learn complex skills for example contact work and physical theatre that will be used in greater depth in Year 9 and KS4. 

It leads to the work that will be done in Year 9 by preparing them to be able to intelligently analyse their own and others work using theatre terms. The students will have a foundation that will allow them to attempt more complex performance work including different genres of theatre and contact work and will enable them to have a deeper knowledge of their chosen performance art. 

 

YEAR GROUP PLANS 

Year 9  

Cycle 1 

Our Day Out 

Cycle 2 

Devising Plays 2 

Cycle 3 

Blackout 

Cycle 4 

Theatre in Education 

Pupils will know: 

  • Scripted Performance of “Our Day Out.” 

  • They will understand the storyline of “Our day out.” 

  • Opportunities for reading from the script, performing sections of script and improvisation tasks. 

  • The students will learn about the individual characters and decipher their objective. 

  • The students will learn Stanislavski techniques to aid knowledge of character and performance of characterisation. 

  • Will know the historical and cultural context of the play. 

  • They will know how to portray varying emotions. 

  • Understand what realism is and “truth.” 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Perform as a given character. 

  • Read from a script showing characterisation. 

  • Stanislavski techniques to help with character deconstruction. 

  • Improvise showing knowledge of characterisation and historical context. 

  • Explain a character's motive. 

  • Evaluate a dramatic performance using key vocabulary. 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to the ideas of Realism, Naturalism and the ideas of Stanislavski. They will have knowledge of the historical context of the play. This will enhance cultural capital by exposing the students to modern theatre techniques that are widely used and will allow them to think more critically about the world they live in. 

 

 

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their ability to rehearse, perform and evaluate themselves by taking part in two practical assessments and a written evaluation. 

Pupils will know: 

  • The procedure for devising a play. 

  • How to use stimuli including but not limited to stories, Music, Pictures, Props and costumes. 

  • How to perform using freeze frames, slow motion, movement, thought tracking, cross-cutting, angel and devil and monologue. 

  • How to create a multi scene performance piece with appropriate transitions.  

  • How to be a respectful audience member. 

  • How to evaluate a performance to aid improvement. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Select appropriate dramatic devices. 

  • Use various stimuli to create ideas for performance. 

  • Perform showing characterisation through the medium of drama. 

  • Devise an appropriate storyline. 

  • Use transitions to show change of scenes. 

  • Explain what is good about a performance and how it could be improved. 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to various stimuli including works of Art, literature and composed pieces. This will enhance cultural capital by exposing the students to various art forms which they will work with creatively. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their ability to devise, rehearse, perform and evaluate themselves by taking part in two practical assessments and a written evaluation. 

Pupils will know: 

  • What is Theatre in education? 

  • They will be able to recognise how theatre in education is used by Mark Wheeller. 

  • The storyline of “Too Much Punch for Judy.” 

  • Basic facts about Brecht. 

  • How to include some Brechtian techniques in their practical work. 

  • How to select appropriate dialogue, action and techniques for their own devised Theatre in Education piece. 

  • What a circular structure is. 

  • The dramatic techniques Flashback, Monologue and breaking the fourth wall. 

  • Taking on a director role whilst rehearsing. 

  • How to communicate meaning through exaggerated use of physical and facial expression. 

  • How to be a respectful audience member. 

  • How to evaluate a performance to aid improvement. 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Perform/explain what Theatre in Education is. 

  • What are Brechtian techniques? 

  • Perform showing characterisation.  

  • Devise their own Theatre in Education piece using Brechtian techniques.  

  • Explain what is good about a performance and how it could be improved. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to the genre of Theatre in Education and the performance work “Too Much Punch for Judy” by Mark Wheeller. This will enhance cultural capital by exposing the students to a different genre of theatre which is widely used today and offers lots of performing arts jobs.  The students will learn about the influential practitioner Brecht.  He has influenced many film and theatre pieces. 

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their ability to rehearse, perform and evaluate themselves by taking part in two practical assessments and a written evaluation.  

Pupils will know: 

  • Basic information about Greek Theatre. 

  • Chorus techniques including vocal unison, canon and echo and movements and gestures. 

  • The basic storyline of Oedipus Rex. 

  • Information about the playwright Davy Anderson. 

  • The storyline of the play “Blackout.” 

  • How to use Greek Theatre techniques in a modern play. 

  • How to take on a director/choreographer role whilst rehearsing. 

  • How to communicate meaning through physical, facial and vocal expression. 

  • How to evaluate a performance to aid improvement. 

  • The steps it takes to put on a performance to a paying audience. 

  • How to stay safe whilst an outside audience is invited. 

  • How to use different performances spaces and locations. 

  • How to work as a team to produce a finished product.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Perform/explain what is Greek Theatre? 

  • Perform showing characterisation through the mediums of drama and dance in a Greek Theatre style. 

  • Behave professionally during a performance to an invited audience. 

  • Explain what is good about a performance and how it could be improved. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to the work of Sophocles and Davey Anderson.   This will enhance cultural capital by exposing the students to the history of theatre and how that has influenced theatre and film they see today. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their ability to rehearse, perform and evaluate themselves by taking part in two practical assessments and a written evaluation. 

Literacy 

Key terms: Realism, Naturalism, Emotion Memory, Objective, Motive, Sub Text, Historical Context, Narrative, Improvisation. 

 

 

Oral learning: Speaking showing tone, meaning and characterisation.

 

Reading opportunities: The script of “Our Day Out. "Key terms and PIT work on evaluation. 

Literacy 

Key terms: Devise, Characterisation, Facial expressions, vocal expressions, Body expressions, Gestures, Blocking, Rehearse, Transitions, Freeze Frame, Slow Motion, Thought Tracking and Monologue. 

 

Oral learning: Speaking showing tone, meaning and characterisation

 

 

Reading opportunities: Literacy stimuli. 

 

Literacy 

Key terms: Theatre in Education, Brecht, Breaking the fourth wall, Epic Theatre, Objective, Circular, Flashback, Monologue 

 

 

 

Oral learning: Speaking showing tone, meaning and characterisation. 

 

Reading opportunities: “Blackout” by Davey Anderson. 

 

Literacy 

Key terms: Greek Theatre, Chorus, Unison, Canon, Echo, Gesture, Stylised movement, Characterisation, Facial expressions, vocal expressions, Body expressions, Rehearsal, Professionalism 

 

 

 

Oral learning: Speaking showing tone, meaning and characterisation.

 

 

Reading opportunities: Oedipus Rex and Blackout script.  

 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: History – Historical context of Liverpool in the 70’s. RE – Understanding motive and cultural influences. PSHE – critical thinking about social context. 

RE/PSHE - Mental health, Confidence, self-esteem, mental wellbeing and physical activity 

Music – articulation, rhythm, performance skills, expression, self-esteem, confidence, teamwork, communication 

Geography – Industrial decline 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: English – understanding text, tone, subtext, speaking communicating meaning, improvisation. Music – Dynamics, Rhythm, Crescendo, diminuendo. 

RE/PSHE - Mental health, Confidence, self-esteem, mental wellbeing and physical activity 

English – reading a script, infering meaning. 

Music – articulation, rhythm, performance skills, expression, self-esteem, confidence, teamwork, communication 

 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: PSHE –RE Links to family relationships and online safety Moral Dilemmas and Ethics. Dance – communicating meaning and emotions through movement. Use of music. History – history of theatre. 

RE/PSHE - Mental health, Confidence, self-esteem, mental wellbeing and physical activity 

Music – articulation, rhythm, performance skills, expression, self-esteem, confidence, teamwork, communication 

 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: English – understanding text, tone, subtext, speaking communicating meaning, improvisation, Shakespeare. Music – Dynamics, Rhythm, Crescendo, diminuendo. PE – reproducing simple movement patterns, choreographing own sequences. History - cultural context of play 

RE/PSHE - Mental health, Confidence, self-esteem, mental wellbeing and physical activity 

Music – articulation, rhythm, performance skills, expression, self-esteem, confidence, teamwork, communication 

Geography/History ancient Greece. 

 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by rehearsal of performance piece and watching the recording of “Our Day Out.” 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by watching professional performance pieces and collating ideas to use in own work. 

 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by learning lines.  Students will complete a written valuation week 9.   

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by learning lines or choreography. Students will complete a written valuation week 9.   

Sequencing 

We have chosen this method of sequencing in Year 9 because we are ensuring that all students have the basic performance skills and ability to critically analysis performance works that will be needed throughout their performing arts education.  We have chosen performance pieces to study that we believe will enthuse the students and inspire a lifelong passion for the performing arts. The skills learnt in Year 9 are more than complex than Year 8 and prepare the students for performing arts in KS4. 

It builds on the work done in Year 8 by increasing the level of difficulty of performance skills and giving the students more opportunities to perform to an audience.  The performing arts scheme of work is driven by the desire to be vocational and stimulating. The students learn complex skills for example performance of a Shakespeare monologue. that will be used in greater depth in KS4. 

It leads to the work that will be done in Year 10 by preparing them to be able to intelligently analyse their own and others work using theatre terms.  The students will have a foundation that will allow them to attempt more complex performance work including different genres of theatre and contact work and will enable them to have a deeper knowledge of their chosen performance art. 

 

YEAR GROUP PLANS 

Year 10  

Cycle 1 

Introduction to Component 1 

Cycle 2 

Introduction to Component 2 

Cycle 3 

Introduction to Component 3 

Cycle 4 

Introduction to Component 3 

continued 

Pupils will know: 

  • The course structure of GCSE Drama. 

  • How to work as part of a team. 

  • Warm up/trust activities. 

  • Performance skills including but not exclusive to vocal colour, facial expressions, body language, gestures, voice projection and vocal clarity. 

  • How to devise a performance piece based on the stimuli “Alice in Wonderland” by The London Physical Theatre Company. 

  • Select, refine and reject ideas for devised piece. 

  • Use other practitioners work to aid the devising process including Frantic Assembly and Onward. 

  • How to evaluate others and own performance to aid improvement. 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Work well as a team showing mutual trust and understanding. 

  • Create a devised physical theatre piece. 

  • Conduct rehearsals using directorial techniques including blocking. 

  • Self-evaluate themselves to aid progress. 

  • Warm up effectively to aid the progress of rehearsals and their own abilities. 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to the ideas of physical theatre. They will study in detail the professional work “Alice in Wonderland” and will look at elements of “Curious Incident.”   

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their devised piece.  Does it fit the brief and is it presented well.  Practical skills that are assessed are their ability to rehearse, show characterisation, perform using physical theatre and self-evaluate themselves to aid progress. 

Pupils will know: 

  • History and context of the genre epic theatre. 

  • Facts about Brecht and his performance style. 

  • Basic plot of “Blood Brothers” by Willy Russell. 

  • Performance techniques required to perform in the style of epic theatre and musical theatre. 

  • How to rehearse a scripted piece. 

  • How to develop characterisation. 

  • How to self-evaluate to aid progress. 

  • Performance techniques required to perform naturalistic. 

  • The storyline of “Blood Brothers.” 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Conduct rehearsals using directorial techniques including blocking. 

  • Self-evaluate themselves to aid progress. 

  • Warm up effectively to aid the progress of rehearsals and their own abilities. 

  • Perform in the style of epic theatre. 

  • Rehearse using naturalism. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to the ideas of epic theatre and naturalisim.. The genres and styles of theatre, physical theatre, comedy and naturalism. They will study in detail the professional work “Blood Brothers” by Willy Russell. 

 

Pupils will have been assessed on practical skills that show their ability to rehearse, show characterisation, perform in a comic style and self-evaluate themselves to aid progress. 

Students will perform their final performance of “Blood Brothers” to an invited audience and guest assessor from another centre. 

 

Pupils will know: 

  • History and context of the play “An Inspector Calls.” 

  • Understanding of the plot, character objectives of “An Inspector Calls.” 

  • Performance techniques required to perform in the style of naturalism. 

  • How to answer short and long style exam questions based on the realisation of the text and character motive. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Understand plot of “An Inspector Calls.” 

  • Explain sub text, character motive, foreshadowing and how to stage key scenes. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to the work of J.B Preistly.  The genres and styles of theatre naturalism. They will study in detail the professional work “An Inspector Calls.”  

 

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their knowledge of “An Inspector calls” in a mock exam of Component 3.   

Pupils will know: 

  • How to evaluate a piece of live theatre. 

  • What are dramatic techniques? 

  • How to use stage lighting effectively to enhance mood, create suspense and focus the audience. 

  • The use of Costume, props, staging, hair costumes, make up and music. 

  • The techniques actors are using to show characterisation and the directors intentions to the audience. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Answer exam style questions based on a live piece of theatre. (This cohort are seeing “School of Rock” at The Marlowe Theatre.) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to the musical theatre work “School of Rock” by Andrew Lloyd Webber.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will have been assessed on a mock exam of the Component 3 paper. 

Literacy 

Key terms: Physical Theatre, Genre, Style, Characterisation, Rehearsal, Blocking, Process, London School of Physical Theatre, Frantic Assembly 

 

Oral learning: Speaking showing tone, meaning and characterisation.

 

Reading opportunities: Research about different genres of theatre and roles and responsibilities within the performing arts industry. 

Literacy 

Key terms: Genre, Style, Characterisation, Rehearsal, Blocking, Process, Brecht, Stanislavski, Mime, Physical theatre, Comedy, Naturalism. 

 

 

 

Oral learning: Speaking showing tone, meaning and characterisation.

 

 

Reading opportunities: Research about Willy Russell and “Blood Brothers.” Script of “Blood Brothers.” 

Literacy 

Key terms: Genre, Style, Characterisation, Motive, Foreshadowing, Objective, Staging, Plot. 

 

 

 

 

Oral learning: Speaking showing tone, meaning and characterisation. 

 

Reading opportunities:  

Literacy 

Key terms: Genre, Style, Characterisation, Rehearsal, Blocking, Process, Brecht, Verbatim, Theatre in Education, Physical theatre, Slapstick, Comedy, Naturalism,  

 

 

 

 

Oral learning: Speaking showing tone, meaning and characterisation.

 

 

Reading opportunities: Research about Theatre in Education, Verbatim and “Chicken.” Script of “Chicken.” 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:  Careers – Looking at different job roles within the performing arts industry. English – storytelling, communicating meaning, tone, subtext and narrative. History – History of theatre. 

Science – warming up the vocal chords/vibrations 

Music – articulation, rhythm, performance skills, expression, self-esteem, confidence, teamwork, communication 

MFL – Devising and performing role plays. 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: English – storytelling, communicating meaning, tone, subtext and narrative. RE – ethical questions surrounding children.  

Science – warming up the vocal chords/vibrations 

Music – articulation, rhythm, performance skills, expression, self-esteem, confidence, teamwork, communication 

Geography – industrial declines and socio-economic issues. 

MFL – Devising and performing role plays. 

 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: English – Studying “An Inspector Calls” storytelling, communicating meaning, tone, subtext and narrative. RE – Moral dilemmas.  

Science – warming up the vocal chords/vibrations 

Music – articulation, rhythm, performance skills, expression, self-esteem, confidence, teamwork, communication 

MFL – Devising and performing role plays. 

 

 

 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: English – storytelling, communicating meaning, tone, subtext and narrative. RE – Moral dilemmas. 

Science – warming up the vocal chords/vibrations 

Music – articulation, rhythm, performance skills, expression, self-esteem, confidence, teamwork, communication 

MFL – Devising and performing role plays. 

 

 

 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by rehearsal of performance piece and completing research of professional physical theatre works. 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by rehearsal of performance piece and completing weekly tasks that go towards the research project and rehearsal logs that counts towards their grade for Components 1 and 2. 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by rehearsal of performance piece and completing weekly tasks that go towards the research project and rehearsal logs that counts towards their grade for Components 1 and 2. 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by rehearsal of performance piece and completing weekly tasks that go towards the research project and rehearsal logs that counts towards their grade for Component 2. 

Sequencing 

We have chosen this method of sequencing in Year 10 so that the students have adequate preparation for their GCSE qualification.  The students learn about the various theatre genres so they can emulate this in their performances later in the course.  The students learn the required skills for Components 1,2 and 3 so that they can further improve these skills in Year 11. 

It builds on the work done in Year 9 by requiring them to use the skills they have previously learnt in a more complex and critical way.  They will begin to select and reject different performance techniques to suit different styles of performance. 

It leads to the work that will be done in Year 11 by preparing them for their final assessments and exam.  They will be well equipped to go onto a level 3 course or a career in the performing arts industry. 

 

YEAR GROUP PLANS 

Year 11  

Cycle 1 

Cycle 2 

Cycle 3 

Cycle 4 

Pupils will know: 

  • What is theatre in education. 

  • What are Brechtian techniques? 

  • Who is Mark Wheeller? 

  • Performance techniques required to perform in the style of epic theatre. 

  • What is epic theatre. 

  • How to rehearse a scripted piece. 

  • How to develop characterisation. 

  • How to self-evaluate to aid progress. 

  • Performance techniques required to perform in a Brechtian style. 

  • The storyline of “Chicken.” 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Conduct rehearsals using directorial techniques including blocking. 

  • Self-evaluate themselves to aid progress. 

  • Warm up effectively to aid the progress of rehearsals and their own abilities. 

  • Perform in the style of epic theatre and theatre in education. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to the ideas of  Brecht. The genres and styles of theatre, physical theatre, comedy and  epic theatre. They will study in detail the professional work  “Chicken” by Mark Wheeller. 

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their C2 Rehearsal logs and research based on “Chicken.”.  Practical skills that are assessed are their ability to rehearse, show characterisation, perform in a Brechtian style theatre in education piece and self-evaluate themselves to aid progress. 

Students will perform their final performance of “Chicken” to an audience. 

Pupils will know: 

  • How to use various stimuli to devise a performance work. 

  • How to select and reject numerous dramatic techniques to fit an exam brief and improve creativity. 

  • How to work as a team to create a shared objective. 

  • Performance techniques required to perform in a given genre or style. 

  • How to develop characterisation. 

  • How to self-evaluate to aid progress. 

  • Games and techniques to aid progression. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Conduct rehearsals using directorial techniques including blocking. 

  • Self-evaluate themselves to aid progress. 

  • Warm up effectively using games and techniques to aid the progress of rehearsals and their own abilities. 

  • Create work that fits a brief. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to the ideas of theatre practitioners including Brecht, Stanislavski, Frantic Assembly, Willy Russell, Davy Anderson and Mark Wheeller..  

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their ability to produce a theatre work based on a mock brief in preparation for the external exam component 3.  

 

Pupils will know: 

  • How to use various stimuli to devise a performance work. 

  • How to select and reject numerous dramatic techniques to fit an exam brief and improve creativity. 

  • How to work as a team to create a shared objective. 

  • Performance techniques required to perform in a given genre or style. 

  • How to develop characterisation. 

  • How to self-evaluate to aid progress. 

  • Games and techniques to aid progression. 

  • How to plan effectively for a theatre work based on a given brief. 

  • How to evaluate own skills to improve knowledge to answer an exam brief. 

  • How to self-evaluate performance of a professional work they have created and performed in.  

 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Conduct rehearsals using directorial techniques including blocking. 

  • Plan effectively for a theatre work that answers a brief. 

  • Self-evaluate themselves to aid progress. 

  • Warm up effectively using games and techniques to aid the progress of rehearsals and their own abilities. 

  • Create work that fits a brief. 

  • Evaluate their own performance and how they used the exam brief. 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to the ideas of theatre practitioners including Brecht, Stanislavski, Frantic Assembly, Willy Russell, Davy Anderson and Mark Wheeller..  

 

 

 

 

Pupils will have been assessed externally on component 3 – Activity 1 Plan, Activity 2, Skills Audit, Activity 3 – Performance of work. Activity 4 – Evaluation. 

Pupils will know: 

  • How to use various stimuli to devise a performance work. 

  • How to select and reject numerous dramatic techniques to fit an exam brief and improve creativity. 

  • How to work as a team to create a shared objective. 

  • Performance techniques required to perform in a given genre or style. 

  • How to develop characterisation. 

  • How to self-evaluate to aid progress. 

  • Games and techniques to aid progression. 

  • How to plan effectively for a theatre work based on a given brief. 

  • How to evaluate own skills to improve knowledge to answer an exam brief. 

  • How to self-evaluate performance of a professional work they have created and performed in.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Conduct rehearsals using directorial techniques including blocking. 

  • Plan effectively for a theatre work that answers a brief. 

  • Self-evaluate themselves to aid progress. 

  • Warm up effectively using games and techniques to aid the progress of rehearsals and their own abilities. 

  • Create work that fits a brief. 

  • Evaluate their own performance and how they used the exam brief. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to the ideas of theatre practitioners including Brecht, Stanislavski, Frantic Assembly, Willy Russell, Davy Anderson and Mark Wheeller..  

 

 

 

 

Pupils will have been assessed externally on component 3 – Activity 1 Plan, Activity 2, Skills Audit, Activity 3 – Performance of work. Activity 4 – Evaluation. 

 

Literacy 

Key terms: Genre, Style, Characterisation, Rehearsal, Blocking, Process, Brecht, Stanislavski, Mime, Physical theatre, Theatre in Education, Verbatim 

 

 

 

 

Oral learning: Speaking showing tone, meaning and characterisation.

 

Reading opportunities: Research about theatre in education and verbatim and the profession work “Chicken.” Script of “Chicken.” 

Literacy 

Key terms: Genre, Style, Characterisation, Rehearsal, Blocking, Process, Brecht, Stanislavski, Mime, Physical theatre, Theatre in Education, Verbatim 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oral learning: Speaking showing tone, meaning and characterisation.

 

 

Reading opportunities: Research based on the exam brief.  

Literacy 

Key terms: Genre, Style, Characterisation, Rehearsal, Blocking, Process, Brecht, Stanislavski, Mime, Physical theatre, Theatre in Education, Verbatim, Freeze Frame, Slow Motion, Thought Tracking, Cross-Cutting, Multi-role, Costume, Props, Scenery, Music, Movement, Contact 

 

Oral learning: Speaking showing tone, meaning and characterisation. 

 

Reading opportunities: Research based on the exam brief. 

Literacy 

Key terms: Genre, Style, Characterisation, Rehearsal, Blocking, Process, Brecht, Stanislavski, Mime, Physical theatre, Theatre in Education, Verbatim, Freeze Frame, Slow Motion, Thought Tracking, Cross-Cutting, Multi-role, Costume, Props, Scenery, Music, Movement, Contact 

 

 

 

 

Oral learning: Speaking showing tone, meaning and characterisation.

 

 

Reading opportunities: Research based on the exam brief. 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: English – storytelling, communicating meaning, tone, subtext and narrative. RE – Moral dilemmas. 

Science – warming up the vocal chords/vibrations 

Music – articulation, rhythm, performance skills, expression, self-esteem, confidence, teamwork, communication 

MFL – Devising and performing role plays. 

 

 

 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: English – storytelling, communicating meaning, tone, subtext and narrative. RE – Moral dilemmas. Music – creating storyline from a music stimulus. Dance – Creating movement pieces. History – context of devised piece. 

Science – warming up the vocal chords/vibrations 

Music – articulation, rhythm, performance skills, expression, self-esteem, confidence, teamwork, communication 

MFL – Devising and performing role plays. 

 

 

 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: English – storytelling, communicating meaning, tone, subtext and narrative. RE – Moral dilemmas. Music – creating storyline from a music stimulus. Dance – Creating movement pieces. History – context of devised piece. 

Science – warming up the vocal chords/vibrations 

Music – articulation, rhythm, performance skills, expression, self-esteem, confidence, teamwork, communication 

MFL – Devising and performing role plays. 

 

 

 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: English – storytelling, communicating meaning, tone, subtext and narrative. RE – Moral dilemmas. Music – creating storyline from a music stimulus. Dance – Creating movement pieces. History – context of devised piece. 

Science – warming up the vocal chords/vibrations 

Music – articulation, rhythm, performance skills, expression, self-esteem, confidence, teamwork, communication 

MFL – Devising and performing role plays. 

 

 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by rehearsal of performance piece and completing weekly tasks that go towards the research project and rehearsal logs that counts towards their grade for Component 2. 

 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by completing research based on the exam brief and rehearsing and consolidating lines for the final performance. 

 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by completing research based on the exam brief and rehearsing and consolidating lines for the final performance. Some students will also use this time to complete any work that has not been done in components 1 and 2. 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by completing research based on the exam brief and rehearsing and consolidating lines for the final performance. Some students will also use this time to complete any work that has not been done in components 1 and 2. 

 

Sequencing 

We have chosen this method of sequencing in Year 11 because the students need to complete the external exam component 3. 

It builds on the work done in Year 10 by using the students' knowledge of different genres, styles and performance techniques to create their final performance work. 

It leads to the work that will be done in Year 12 because the students will be well equipped to go onto a level 3 course or a career in the performing arts industry.  

 

Our Mission and Values

“Therefore learn as if to live forever; live as if to die tomorrow” (St Edmund of Abingdon)

Read Our Values & Ethos Statement

Trust Information

St Edmund's Catholic School is an academy, and part of the Kent Catholic Schools’ Partnership. The Kent Catholic Schools’ Partnership is an exempt charity and a company limited by guarantee registered in England and Wales under company registration number 08176019 at registered address: Barham Court, Teston, Maidstone, Kent, ME18 5BZ. St Edmund's Catholic School is a business name of Kent Catholic Schools’ Partnership.

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