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Curriculum Plan

SUBJECT: Religious Studies

 

CURRICULUM PLAN

 

RS Curriculum Intent Statement

 

Do not conform to the pattern of this world but be transformed by the renewing of your mind".  Romans 12:2

The RS Department strive to foster a loving and safe environment for all students. Basing our daily lives around the Gospel values of Faith, Service, Courage, Justice, Love and Hope. At St Edmund's we acknowledge that this must be driven from the heart of the school. Guided by the RS staff, the students anchor their own spiritual development not only for themselves but for everyone within this Catholic Christian Community.

 

The National Curriculum

We follow the Curriculum Directory as stipulated by the Bishops Conference for England and Wales

 

 

 

 

SUBJECT KEY CONCEPTS / COMPOSITES

 

 

Key Stage 3

 

Year 7: Introduction to St Edmunds Catholic School, Creation, The Old Testament and Judaism Term, Paschal Mystery, The Early Christian Church, Hinduism.

Year 8: Prophets, Sacraments, The Gospels, Life after Death and Community Cohesion, Crime and Punishment, Islam.

Year 9: Buddhism, Dignity of the Human Person, Sikhism, God’s Call (Vocation), Mark’s Gospel, Believing in God

 

Key Stage 4

 

Follow EDEXCEL GCSE:

Year 10: Catholic Beliefs and Teachings, Catholic Practices, Catholic Sources of Wisdom and Authority, Catholic Forms of Expression and Ways of Life, Jewish Beliefs and Teachings, Jewish Practices.

Year 11: Arguments for the Existence of God, Religious Teachings on Relationships and Families in the 21st Century and Exam preparation.

 

 

 

CURRICULUM PLAN: KEY STAGE 3

 

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Knowledge

Pupils will know:

  • The foundation of Catholic Christian faith including beliefs around God, Jesus, the Bible and alternative Christians denominations.
  • Creation-Christian and non-religious creation beliefs, the fall of humanity and the call to stewardship.
  • Covenants-Key figures within the Christian/Jewish faith and the history of the Jewish religion.
  • The person of Jesus and the final week of Jesus’ life.
  • Growth of the Christian Church and the development of other Christian beliefs.
  • Hinduism-Explore the eastern religions key beliefs and practices.

 

 

 

We have chosen to teach this knowledge because it gives a grounding in the key figures, beliefs and historical roots of the Roman Catholic/Christian faith. Hinduism gives students exposure to a different culture and understanding of different beliefs.

Pupils will know:

  • The Prophets, including Old Testament and New Testament understandings and examples.
  • The Gospel writers, their purpose in writing the accounts and the diverse ways Jesus is portrayed.
  • Different concepts of Life after death, principle of sanctity of life, and issues of poverty and injustice.
  • Concept of Crime, law and punishment and how the Catholic Church responds to these social issues. ​
  • Key Islamic beliefs, teachings and religious practice. These include the concept of God, importance of Muhammed and the Five Pillars.

 

 

 

 

We have chosen to teach this knowledge because it gives a deeper insight into how Catholics/ Christians practice and reflect on their faith in an increasingly secularised society. Islam gives students the opportunity to look at the final monotheistic faith, its links to Judaism and Christianity and how they share similar religious beliefs and practices.

Pupils will know:

  • Key beliefs and teaching in Buddhism. Including religious practice, the 8-fold Path, 10 Noble Truths and search for Enlightenment.
  • Dignity of the Human Person-Concept of Conscience, how its formed and diverse views on Human Rights and Medical Ethics.
  • Sikhism. How Sikhs pray, worship, and identify as a faith community. How Sikhs support those in need.
  • The life and teachings of Jesus through the study of Mark’s Gospel
  • Diverse beliefs on the existence of God, particularly in relation to evil and suffering, responses to unanswered prayers and how the media portrays a belief in God.

 

 We have chosen to teach this knowledge to enable our students to reflect on the spiritual journey individuals might undertake. To understand the concept of suffering and understand how conscience and belief can inform decision making.

Skills

Pupils will be able to:

  • Identify sources of Catholic and other religious beliefs and explain how distinctive religious beliefs arise.
  • Describe and explain the meaning and purpose of a variety of forms of worship.
  • Identify similarities and differences between people’s responses to social and moral issues because of their beliefs.
  • Explain what beliefs and values inspire and influence them and others.
  • Demonstrate how religious beliefs and teaching give some explanation of the purpose and meaning of human life.

Pupils will be able to:

  • Explain how the prophet’s message was received by others and how the people treated the prophets.
  • Explain the significance for believers of different forms of religious and spiritual celebration.
  • Explain how religious beliefs and teaching influence moral values and behaviour.
  • Express insights into the reasons for their own and others’ beliefs and values and the challenges of belonging to a religion.
  • Explain with reference to religious beliefs their own and others’ answers to questions of meaning.

Pupils will be able to:

  • Show a coherent understanding of faith, religion and belief using a variety of sources and evidence.
  • Use a wide religious and philosophical vocabulary to show a coherent understanding of religious celebration.
  • Critically evaluate the ways of life of religious groups with reference to their history and culture and show a coherent understanding of differences.
  • Articulate their own critical response(s) to different religious beliefs and world views.
  • Evaluate religious and nonreligious views and beliefs on questions of meaning and purpose.

Cultural Capital

Pupils will all have been exposed to [the ideas of/the texts/the concepts/the composites]:

  • The Bible
  • The Catechism of the Catholic Church
  • The Tanakh
  • The Vedas
  • The Big Bang Theory
  • The Theory of Evolution
  • The Paschal Mystery
  • The Great Schism

 

This will enhance cultural capital because religion and the sacred texts of each religion are a major source of inspiration, meaning, and controversy in human culture, informing history, politics, economics, art, and literature.

Pupils will all have been exposed to [the ideas of/the texts/the concepts/the composites]:

  • The Bible
  • The Catechism of the Catholic Church
  • The Qur’an
  • The Hadith
  • Theories of punishment

 

 

 

 

This will enhance cultural capital because religious studies make a key and unique contribution to understanding British heritage, plurality, values and futures.

Pupils will all have been exposed to [the ideas of/the texts/the concepts/the composites]:

  • The Bible
  • The Catechism of the Catholic Church
  • Guru Granth Sahib
  • The Tipitaka
  • The Universal Declaration of Human Rights
  • The Theodicies of Augustine and Irenaeus

 

This will enhance cultural capital because in the study of religion pupils learn to respect themselves and understand their own identity, to respect others, and to understand their own and others' rights and responsibilities. At a time when communities are becoming more diverse there is an even greater need for a more religiously literate and tolerant society. Religious Studies plays a key role in creating social cohesion and generating genuine understanding between communities reducing friction, intolerance and social unrest.

Assessment:
Formative – classwork and homework.

Summative – end of cycle assessments and end of year examination.

Pupils will have been assessed on:

  • Their knowledge of the beliefs and history of the Catholic Church and other Christian denominations
  • Their understanding of the different theories of Creation
  • Their knowledge of the development of the Judaeo-Christian tradition
  • Their interpretation of the Paschal Mystery
  • Their knowledge of the main beliefs and practices of Hinduism

By summative assessment and project-based learning

Pupils will have been assessed on:

  • Their understanding of the Sacraments of the Catholic Church
  • Their interpretation of the themes of the Evangelists
  • Their understanding of the eschatological beliefs of religious and non-religious groups
  • Their evaluation of the legal and justice system of the UK
  • Their knowledge of the main beliefs and practices of Islam

By summative assessment and project-based learning

Pupils will have been assessed on:

  • Their knowledge of the teachings of the Catholic Church and other religions regarding some current issues in medical ethics.
  • Their understanding of the concept of Vocation and its implications
  • Their knowledge of the development of the Judaeo-Christian tradition
  • Their interpretation the main themes of Mark’s Gospel
  • Their analysis of the philosophical proofs of God’s existence and non-existence
  • Their knowledge of the main beliefs and practices of Buddhism and Sikhism

By summative assessment and project-based learning

 

 

CURRICULUM PLAN: KEY STAGE 4

 

Year 10

Year 11

Knowledge

Pupils will know:

  • Catholic Beliefs and Teachings. Key beliefs about the nature of God specifically The Trinity and relationship between God, Jesus and the Holy Spirit.
  • Creation and the nature of humanity. Catholic concepts of salvation.
  • Alternative views on life after death and the importance of Jesus’ resurrection. 
  • Religious Practices. Students will know how Catholics practice their faith. This includes:

Sacraments, Liturgical Worship, Funeral Rites, Pray and purpose of prayer, Popular Piety, Pilgrimage, Catholic Social Teaching and Catholic Mission and Evangelism.

  •  Sources of Wisdom and Authority- Students evaluate where Christians get their moral and religious values from. This includes:
  • The Bible and how it is interpreted, The Magisterium and hierarchy of the Catholic Church, Vatican II, The Church as the Body of Christ, Four Marks of the Church, Mary as a role model and Personal and Ethical Decision Making.
  • Forms of Expression and Ways of Life. This includes, Church architecture, features within a church, Sacred Objects, Artwork, sculpture and statues, Symbolism and imagery in Religious Art, Drama and Music. 

 

Pupils will know:

  • Jewish Beliefs and Teachings- Students will know key beliefs and teachings on:
  • The Almighty, how the Almighty’s presence is felt through shekinah, different beliefs around the Messiah, The importance of the Covenant at Sinai and with Abraham, The Sanctity of Life, Moral Principles and the Mitzvot and alternative Jewish views on Life after Death.
  • Jewish Practises- This includes:

Public Acts of Worship, Importance of Tanakh and Talmud, concept of prayer and private prayer, The Shema and Amidah, Jewish Rituals and Ceremonies, Shabbat, Jewish Festivals and the Synagogue.

Philosophy and Ethics-Arguments for the existence of God. Students will explore alternative beliefs on God’s existence through concepts such as:

  • Revelation, Visions and Miracles. Religious Experiences, The Design Argument, Cosmological Argument, The existence of suffering and the Solutions to problem and suffering.
  • Religious Teachings on Relationships and Families in the 21st Century. Students will know different views on:
  • Marriage and purpose of marriage, Sexual Relationships, Family and different types of families, Support for the family, Family Planning, Divorce, Annulment and Re-Marriage, Gender Equality and Gender Prejudice and Discrimination.

 

Skills

Pupils will be able to:

  • Provide knowledge of religion and belief by recalling information
  • Provide an understanding of religion and belief and contrast with that of another.
  • Provide understanding of an aspect of religion and belief and developing this beyond a habitual response.
  • Reference sources of wisdom or authority in support of their explanation.
  • Interpret a given stimulus to consider different viewpoints and perspectives relating to the importance or significance of a particular aspect of a religion or belief.
  • Deconstruct information or issue at hand, by constructing logical chains of reasoning and making connections between the elements in the question.

Pupils will be able to:

  • Provide knowledge of religion and belief by recalling information
  • Provide an understanding of religion and belief and contrast with that of another.
  • Provide understanding of an aspect of religion and belief and developing this beyond a habitual response.
  • Reference sources of wisdom or authority in support of their explanation.
  • Interpret a given stimulus in order to consider different viewpoints and perspectives relating to the importance or significance of a particular aspect of a religion or belief.
  • Deconstruct information or issue at hand, by constructing logical chains of reasoning and making connections between the elements in the question.

Cultural Capital

Pupils will all have been exposed to [the ideas of/the texts/the concepts/the composites]:

  • The Bible
  • The Catechism of the Catholic Church
  • The Teachings of other Christian Denominations
  • Lumen Gentium
  • Dei Verbum
  • Gaudium et Spes
  • Sacrosanctum Concilium

 

This will enhance cultural capital because the study of these texts and concepts makes a significant contribution to pupils’ academic and personal development. It also plays a key role in promoting social cohesion and the virtues of respect and empathy, which are important in our diverse society.

Pupils will all have been exposed to [the ideas of/the texts/the concepts/the composites]:

  • The Bible
  • The Catechism of the Catholic Church
  • The Tanakh
  • The Talmud
  • Aquinas’ Five Ways
  • William Paley’s Analogy
  • The Theodicies of Augustine and Irenaeus

 

This will enhance cultural capital because the study of these texts and concepts makes a significant contribution to pupils’ academic and personal development. It also plays a key role in promoting social cohesion and the virtues of respect and empathy, which are important in our diverse society.

Assessment:
Formative – classwork and homework.

Summative – end of cycle assessments and end of year examination.

Pupils will have been assessed on:

  • Their study of Catholic Christianity within the context of the wider British society, the religious traditions of which are, in the main, Christian.
  • Their ability to compare and contrast the areas of belief and practice within Catholic Christianity with wider Christian perspectives within beliefs about the afterlife and their significance and the practice and significance of worship

By summative assessment which allows students to:

  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of religion and belief, including beliefs, practices and sources of authority, influence on individuals, communities and societies and similarities and differences within and/or between religions and beliefs.
  • Analyse and evaluate aspects of religion and belief, including their significance and influence.

Pupils will have been assessed on:

  • Their study of Judaism within the context of the wider British society, the religious traditions of which are, in the main, Christian.
  • Their ability to compare and contrast two areas of belief and practice within Christianity and Judaism
    • beliefs about the afterlife and their significance
    • the practice and significance of worship
  • Their ability to compare and contrast the areas of ethics and/or philosophy within Catholic Christianity with wider Christian perspectives and non-religious views

By summative assessment which allows students to:

  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of religion and belief, including beliefs, practices and sources of authority, influence on individuals, communities and societies and similarities and differences within and/or between religions and beliefs.
  • Analyse and evaluate aspects of religion and belief, including their significance and influence.

 

 

YEAR GROUP PLANS

 

Year 7

Term 1-Catholic Life

Term 2-Creation

Term 3-The Old Testament and Judaism

Term 4-Paschal Mystery

Term 5-The Early Church

Term 6-Hindiusm

  • Pupils will know:
  • Foundations of the Catholic/Christian faith. This includes concepts of Who God is, Jesus Christ, different Christian denominations, what it means to be part of a Catholic community and how Catholics practice their faith.

 

  • Pupils will be able to demonstrate an understanding of what it means to be catholic, who Catholics believe Jesus is and his sacrifice. Students will be able to demonstrate concept of worship and its importance. Students will understand their position in a Catholic school.

 

  • Pupils will all have been exposed to different types of worship and how the faith is practiced. They will be exposed to St Edmund, given an opportunity to develop a personal relationship with God and Jesus and find their place within the catholic community, during and outside curriculum time. Students will experience mission day led by the chaplain and RE department.

 

  • Pupils will have been assessed on Catholic Life by key word tests, extended writing tasks and end of topic tests.
  • Pupils will know:
  • The Christian beliefs about the creation of the world. Students will explore the relationship between man and God. They will know the differences between Old and New Testaments. They will explore the ideology of sin and its effect in the world today. They will know why Christians believe they are stewards of the world.

 

  • Pupils will be able to: Have a physical impact on the school environment, promoting stewardship.
  • Students will be able to explain alternative views on the creation of the world. Students will be able explain how sin caused a drift between humanity and God.

 

  • Pupils will all have been exposed to [the ideas of/the texts/the concepts/ the composites]: The bible and how it works. Reconciliation within the Catholic Church.

 

  • Pupils will be exposed to the scientific explanations of the creation of the world.

 

  • Pupils will have been assessed on Creation by key word tests, student presentation and end of topic tests.
  • Pupils will know:
  • The foundations of the Old Testament and key figures within the Judeo/Christian faith. They will also know Jewish concept on worship and how they practice their faith through festivals.

 

  • Pupils will be able to understand the concept of Covenant, keys figures such as Abraham and Moses and their importance. Students will also be able to understand the foundations of the Jewish faith.

 

  • Pupils will all have been exposed to the foundations of the Judeo/Christian faith and its routes. Students will also be exposed to the Jewish faith and practice and the shared beliefs between two monotheistic faith.

 

  • Pupils will have been assessed on the idea of Covenant; the importance of Abraham and his family for the Christian/Judeo tradition; Jewish slavery in Egypt and how the Jews celebrate their freedom today.
  • Pupils will know:
  • The timeline of Jesus last week. They will follow Jesus’ Journey in Jerusalem.

 

  • Students will know how Jesus was tortured, suffered in the cross and was buried. They will know the days after Christ’s resurrection and why he descended into hell. They will look at Christ’s relationship with his disciples. Students will know the human side of Christ in Gethsemane.

 

  • Pupils will be able to: Explain how Christ died and why his death and resurrection is important to Christians. Students will be able to understand that Christ is both human and divine. Students will be able students will be able to describe the events that happened throughout the last week of Jesus’ life.

 

  • Pupils will all have been exposed to the Gospels accounts of Jesus’ passion, death, resurrection and ascension. They will know the foundations of the Christian faith.

 

  • Pupils will have been assessed formally on how the early church grew; the role and mission of the Church, the role of Peter, how the SVP help support local communities.
  • Pupils will know the origins of the Catholic Christian faith, from Pentecost to modern time. They will be able to understand the concept of Community and the role/mission of the Church.

 

  • Pupils will be able to understand the concept of community and being part of a universal church, understand how the early church grew, know that the mission, power and authority Jesus gave to the Apostles has been passed on to the Church today, know how the church and wider communities use the Teachings of Jesus, understand the work of the SVP and how they use the Church to impact their work, Gain an understanding of how Church communities help promote community cohesion and explain how Christians can follow the example set by Pope Francis.

 

  • Pupils will all have been exposed to the idea of community, develop an understanding of values and morals within society and understand the mission of the church including charitable giving.

 

  • Pupils will have been formally assessed on how the early church grew; the role and mission of the Church, the role of Peter, how the SVP help support local communities and how the Pope directs the church today.
  • Pupils will know the origins of the Hindu faith, key beliefs and practice. They will also know Hindu beliefs around some key ethical issues.

 

  • Pupils will be able to understand Hindu belief around God and deities, Hindu holy books, the meaning of the Ramayana, what you find in a Hindu temple, how Hindus worship, the festivals that Hindus celebrate, Hindu beliefs about life after death, concept of karma, explore creation accounts within Hinduism and discover how Hindus make moral decisions.

 

  • Pupils will all have been exposed to a different culture and way of life. Focused on the Eastern traditions they will explore how religious beliefs and observances impact the day to day lives of Hindu’s. They will also gain knowledge of how Hindu’s practice their faith differently.

 

  • Pupils will have been assessed formally on their knowledge of the Ramayana, how Hindu’s worship, their understanding of the Trimutri, how Hindu’s practice their faith, belief in the afterlife and how Hindus aim to protect the planet.

Literacy

Key terms:

Catholic

Saint

Christian

Church

Christ

Saviour

Sacrifice

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading opportunities:

Students will have opportunities to read New Testament readings.

 

Students will reflect upon the story of Jesus’ Birth.

 

Students will read and reflect upon the major Catholic prayers.

 

Students will have opportunities to read and study the Mass parts.

Literacy

Key terms:

Testament

Creation

Evil

Love

Sin

Serpent

Knowledge

Omnipotent

Omnibenevolent

Omniscient

Temptation

Stewardship

 

Reading opportunities:

Students will be reading Genesis.

 

Students will have time to follow the Reconciliation layout for the Catholic sacrament

Literacy

Key terms:

Commandment

Contract

Covenant

Decalogue

Descendants

Exodus

Passover

Pesach

Plague

Promise

Prophet

Seder  

 

Reading opportunities: Students will read extracts from the Old Testament, notably Genesis and Exodus. They will read from key Jewish texts and will use textbooks to support their learning.

 

Literacy

Key terms:

Ascension

Crucifixion

Trial

Governor

Sacrifice

Resurrection

Redemption

Paschal

Mystery

 

 

 

 

Reading opportunities:

Students will read various Biblical accounts of the death of Jesus. They will read different Gospel accounts of the events which led to Jesus’ death, resurrection and ascension.

Literacy

Key terms:

Pentecost,

Church,

church,

mission,

SVP,

Apostles,

Community,

Magisterium,

Taizé

 

 

 

 

Reading opportunities:

Students will have read the Truth book. They will read parts of Acts and will have conducted their own individual research

Literacy

Key terms:

Hindu,

Mandir,

Atman,

Dharma,

Varna,

Karma,

Samsara,

Moksha,

Murti,

Brahman,

Bhagavan.

Trimurti

 

Reading opportunities:

Students will read Hindu sacred texts; they will read from Hindu textbooks and will be conducting their own research.

 

Connections

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:

Geography and History – the development of Christianity across the Middle East and Europe over the past 2000 years

Connections

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:

Science – scientific theories like the Big Bang and Evolution.  

Connections

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:

Geography – The Middle East

Connections

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:

Geography – The Middle East and Europe

Connections

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:

History – Reformation

Connections

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:

Art – Rangoli Patterns

Learning at home

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by producing a range of RE activities. This may include short or extended piece of writing, research into a topic or issue, and regular testing on pupil knowledge of RE key words/vocab. 

Learning at home

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by producing a range of RE activities. This may include short or extended piece of writing, research into a topic or issue, and regular testing on pupil knowledge of RE key words/vocab.

Learning at home

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by producing a range of RE activities. This may include short or extended piece of writing, research into a topic or issue, and regular testing on pupil knowledge of RE key words/vocab.

Learning at home

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by producing a range of RE activities. This may include short or extended piece of writing, research into a topic or issue, and regular testing on pupil knowledge of RE key words/vocab.

Learning at home

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by producing a range of RE activities. This may include short or extended piece of writing, research into a topic or issue, and regular testing on pupil knowledge of RE key words/vocab.

Learning at home

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by producing a range of RE activities. This may include short or extended piece of writing, research into a topic or issue, and regular testing on pupil knowledge of RE key words/vocab.

Sequencing

The curriculum is intended to give a firm grounding in the Catholic/Christian faith. By doing so it enables the students to develop excellent historical and theological knowledge of Christianity and how the faith grew from Judaism. Students develop their understanding through the introduction of St Edmunds at the beginning of the year (what is Christianity and what is unique about a Catholic setting), tracing the roots of the Christian faith and concept of God through the Old Testament (Creation and Old Testament and Judaism Schemes). Students then explore how Jesus through The New Testament established a New Covenant and how Christianity grew (Paschal Mystery and Early Church). Hinduism is included to give our students exposure to a different culture, belief system and way of life. It gives students the opportunity to develop knowledge of a very different religious outlook.

This builds on work from year 6 because we have a large and diverse pool of students from different feeder schools and their exposure to RE will be varied as students are from different starting points.

It leads to the work that will be done in Year 8 (next year) by giving students the grounding needed to delve deeper into religious practice and belief. This is aimed at helping students make connections between the origins and foundation of faith to developing knowledge and understanding of how people practice and celebrate their faith.

 

 

YEAR GROUP PLANS

Year 8

Term 1-Prophets

Term 2-Sacraments

Term 3-The Gospels

Term 4-Life after Death and Community Cohesion

Term 5-Crime and Punishment.

Term 6-Islam

  • Pupils will know key prophets of the Old Testament including Amos, Hosea, Jeremiah, Isaiah and Samuel. They will consider God’s message and prophetic role of the Church.

 

 

  • Pupils will be able to understand what prophecy means, the key prophetic teachings of the prophets, how they relayed God’s message and how they developed a greater understanding of God for humanity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Pupils will all have been exposed to key prophetic messages and how the Old Testament substantially influences our understanding of key biblical teachings including the link to the New Testament.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Pupils will have been assessed on the prophets by key word and end of topic test assessments. 
  • Pupils will know the importance of the Sacraments and how Catholics undertake the sacraments. Students will also consider the role of the family and purpose of marriage.

 

 

 

  • Pupils will be able to know that a sacrament is ‘an outward sign’ of an inward blessing’. They will know the signs and symbols of the sacraments, develop an understanding of the 7 sacraments and how and why they are carried out.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Pupils will all have been exposed to the importance of the sacraments, how and why they are undertaken by Catholics. Pupils will know the concept of marriage and why couples take up the vocation of marriage. Students will also be exposed to the concept of family and the different types of family unit. They will understand the concept of divorce and concept of sex before marriage.

 

  • Pupils will have been assessed on the different sacraments, the signs and symbols within each sacrament, how the sacraments are carried out and why they are important theologically for Christians. Students
  • Pupils will know Who the Gospel writers are and the purpose of their Gospel. They will also understand key teachings within each Gospel.

 

 

 

 

  • Pupils will be able to describe each Gospel writer, who their audience was and the purpose of the gospel. They will understand how Jesus is portrayed, his key teachings and how they link to the message of the Gospel writer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Pupils will all have been exposed to the formation of the Gospel’s. They will be given an insight into the historical person of Jesus and the impact the writers had in the development of the Christian faith.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Pupils will have been assessed on the Gospel writers and their audience; the purpose of each Gospel and how they independently focused on different themes. Students will also evaluate whether there is need for 4 Gospels.
  • Pupils will know religious and non-religious views of the afterlife, explore ethical issues such as gender equality, role of men and women, prejudice, discrimination, Multi-ethnic and Multi faith society.

 

  • Pupils will be able to describe alternative views on the afterlife, they will be able to explore different social attitudes towards different groups and belief systems. They will be able to look at the advantages and disadvantages that these key groups, beliefs and attitudes bring.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Pupils will all have been exposed to differences within society, exploring the benefits and disadvantages that a diverse society brings. They will also be exposed to religious attitudes to these ethical debates.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Pupils will have been assessed formatively on the changing role of men and women, how Catholics and Christians respond to social issues such as racism, discrimination and prejudice; the concept of seeking asylum and how the Church responds to this crisis; we will assess different opinions on the afterlife.

Pupils will know concept of law, justice and forms of punishment including Capital Punishment; they will look at use of drugs and alcohol and conflict within the home and wider society. This includes idea of war, theories of Just War, promotion of world peace and conflict.

 

  • Pupils will be able to, reflect upon the need for law, justice and punishment including arguments for and against justice. Know the nature of capital punishment Reflect upon secular and religious arguments for and against capital punishmentKnow laws and social problems caused on drugs and alcohol and the reasons for themKnow social and health problems caused by drugs and alcohol and how religions respond to these issues. Students will explain Christian teachings on forgiveness and reconciliation

 

  • Pupils will all have been exposed to different views on crime, punishment, justice and conflict

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Pupils will have been assessed formatively on exploring alternative views on Capital Punishment, the need for laws and justice, reasons why conflict occurs and how all people including Catholic Chris tians can promote forgiveness and reconciliation.

Pupils will know: The foundations of the Islamic faith. Consider the importance of key figures such Muhammed and Allah. How Muslims practice their faith in terms of prayer, worship and in their ethical behaviour and attitudes.

 

 

  • Pupils will be able to know who Muslims are and what they believe. Know the importance of Muhammad and the Qur’an. Know and evaluate how Muslims worship and pray. Pupils will know Muslim attitudes towards life after death, how they make moral decisions, he importance of the family and the concept of Islamophobia and extremism.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Pupils will all have been exposed to the concept of the 5 Pillars and its importance. The links between Christianity, Judaism and Islam as monotheistic faiths, pupils will know the importance of family and worship. Also, students will be exposed to the common misconceptions around extremism and Islamophobia.

 

  • Pupils will have been assessed formatively on the importance of the Qur’an, beliefs around prayer, the importance of the 5 pillars and Muhammad. Students will also understand concept of Shariah law, life after death and the importance of the family.

Literacy

Key terms:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading opportunities:

Key religious texts like the Bible (Old and New Testaments), the Qur’an, the Hadith, and ethical texts and stories on issues surrounding crime, punishment and life and death.  

Literacy

Key terms:

Baptism,

Sacrament,

Confirmation,

The Eucharist, Reconciliation,

Holy Orders,

Anointing of the sick, Healing,

Unconditional love,

Original sin,

vocation,

Divorce,

Sex outside of marriage.

Family.

Priest, Prophet and King.

 

Reading opportunities:

Biblical texts directly linked to the Sacraments, extracts from the Catechism of the Catholic church and extracts from The Way and The Truth textbooks.

Literacy

Key terms:

Apostle

Beatitudes

Bible

Christ

Commissioned

Disciple

Evangelist

Gospel

Magi

Messiah

Salvation

Testament   

 

 

 

 

Reading opportunities:

Extracts from the Gospel accounts of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, The Truth textbook. Online resources.

Literacy

Key terms:

Immortality of the soul, Resurrection,

Near-death experience, Paranormal,

Inter-Faith marriages

Multi-faith society

Pluralism

Exclusivism

Conversion

Community Cohesion

Racism

Racial Harmony.

 

 

 

 

Reading opportunities:

Key texts from the Bible, newspaper articles, online research and case studies, religion and life textbook.

Literacy

Key terms:

Crime,

Justice,

Law,

Responsibility,

Sin,

Deterrence,

Reform,

Rehabilitation,

Retribution,

Judgement,

Capital Punishment,

Addiction,

 

 

 

 

Reading opportunities: Key texts from the Bible on forgiveness, Newspaper articles, case studies, Religion and Life Textbook and Independent research both online and at home.

Literacy

Key terms:

Muslim,

PBUH,

Allah,

Mosque,

Qur'an,

Hadith,

Zakah,

Imam,

 Shari’ah,

Wudu,

Hajj and

Sawm

Pilgrimage

Islamophobia

Extremism

 

Reading opportunities: Key texts from the Qur’an and Haith, Islamic religious textbooks, newspaper articles, accounts from Muslims practicing their faith and online resources for project.

Connections

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:

Geography – Middle East

Connections

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:

PSHE and Science – Ethical and biological issues like contraception, family life and divorce. 

Connections

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:

History – Roman empire and early church. 

Connections

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:

PSHE and Science – Humanism

Connections

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:

PSHE – law and justice  

Connections

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:

History – the crusades

Learning at home

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by producing a range of RE activities. This may include short or extended piece of writing, research into a topic or issue, and regular testing on pupil knowledge of RE key words/vocab. 

Learning at home

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by producing a range of RE activities. This may include short or extended piece of writing, research into a topic or issue, and regular testing on pupil knowledge of RE key words/vocab. 

Learning at home

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by producing a range of RE activities. This may include short or extended piece of writing, research into a topic or issue, and regular testing on pupil knowledge of RE key words/vocab. 

Learning at home

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by producing a range of RE activities. This may include short or extended piece of writing, research into a topic or issue, and regular testing on pupil knowledge of RE key words/vocab. 

Learning at home

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by producing a range of RE activities. This may include short or extended piece of writing, research into a topic or issue, and regular testing on pupil knowledge of RE key words/vocab. 

Learning at home

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by producing a range of RE activities. This may include short or extended piece of writing, research into a topic or issue, and regular testing on pupil knowledge of RE key words/vocab. 

Sequencing

We have chosen this method of sequencing in Year 8 so our students can understand how people with faith practice their faith. These schemes give students the opportunity to learn from scripture and develop an understanding on how these scriptures form religious practice (Prophets, Sacraments and the Gospels). The schemes also give our students the opportunity to see how scripture, beliefs and practices can start to shape and inform individual and collective decisions around moral and ethical situations (Life and Death, Community Cohesion and Crime and Punishment).

The study of Islam is important as it completes the teaching of all 3 monotheistic faiths, linking it back to Christianity and Judaism. Students are able to see how Muslims practice their faith. It is also important for students to recognise and explore the concept of Islamophobia and extremism by exploring alternative views on these topics whilst dispelling any misconceptions

It leads to the work that will be done in Year 9 as it gives a grounding for how people practice their faith and how scripturally this may influence modern day issues.

 

 

YEAR GROUP PLANS

Year 9

Term 1 - Buddhism

Term 2 – Dignity of the Human Person

Term 3 – Sikhism

Term 4 – God’s Call

Term 5 – Mark’s Gospel

Term 6 – Believing in God

Pupils will know:

Key beliefs and teaching in Buddhism. Including religious practice, the 8-fold Path, 10 Noble Truths and search for Enlightenment.

 

Pupils will be able to:

  • develop their knowledge and understanding of Buddhist beliefs, teachings, and sources of wisdom and authority, including through their reading of key religious texts.
  • develop their ability to construct well-argued, well-informed, balanced and structured written arguments, demonstrating their depth and breadth of understanding of Buddhism
  • engage with questions of belief, value, meaning, purpose, truth, and their influence on human life

 

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to [the ideas of/the texts/the concepts/ the composites]:

  • The Tipitaka
  • The Eightfold Path
  • The 10 Noble Truths

 

 

 

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their knowledge of Buddhism by summative assessment and project work.  The summative assessment will assess:

  1. Knowledge of the Cycle of Samsara
  2. Knowledge of Buddhist acts of worship
  3. Knowledge of Buddhist teachings on wealth and poverty
  4. Knowledge of the four noble truths
  5. Knowledge of the eightfold path
  6. Evaluation of Buddhist beliefs in life after death

 

Pupils will know: Dignity of the Human Person-Concept of Conscience, how its formed and diverse views on Human Rights and Medical Ethics.

 

 

Pupils will be able to:

  • develop their knowledge and understanding of beliefs, teachings, and sources of wisdom and authority, regarding the dignity of the human person.
  • develop their ability to construct well-argued, well-informed, balanced and structured written arguments, demonstrating their depth and breadth of understanding of the dignity of the human person
  • engage with questions of belief, value, meaning, purpose, truth, and their influence on human life

 

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to [the ideas of/the texts/the concepts/ the composites]:

  • The Bible
  • The Catechism of the Catholic Church
  • The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their knowledge of the dignity of the human person by summative assessment and project work.  The summative assessment will assess:

  1. Knowledge of Human Rights
  2. Knowledge of Christian responsibilities
  3. Knowledge of Sanctity of Life
  4. Knowledge of moral issues surrounding abortion
  5. Knowledge of moral issues surrounding genetic engineering
  6. Evaluation of moral issues surrounding euthanasia

Pupils will know: Sikh beliefs about God, the main principles of Sikh living today, and assess how the wearing of the 5 Ks affects Sikhs lives today.   

 

Pupils will be able to:

  • develop their knowledge and understanding of beliefs, teachings, and sources of wisdom and authority, regarding Sikh beliefs of God.
  • develop their ability to construct well-argued, well-informed, balanced and structured written arguments, demonstrating their depth and breadth of understanding of Sikhism
  • engage with questions of belief, value, meaning, purpose, truth, and their influence on human life

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to [the ideas of/the texts/the concepts/ the composites]:

  • The Guru Granth Sahib
  • The 10 Gurus
  • The Gurdwara
  • Weheguru
  • Mool Mantra

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their knowledge of issues surrounding Sikhism by summative assessment and project work.  The summative assessment will assess:

  1. Knowledge of the Sikh creed Mool Mantra
  2. Knowledge of the Guru Granth Sahib
  3. Knowledge of Sikh service of Langar
  4. Knowledge of the importance of the Gurdwara in the Sikh community
  5. Knowledge of the 5 Ks and their importance
  6. Assess how the main principles of Sikh living affect the lives of Sikhs today

Pupils will know: How people take up their vocation. How charities support those in need.

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to:

  • develop their knowledge and understanding of beliefs, teachings, and sources of wisdom and authority, regarding vocation
  • develop their ability to construct well-argued, well-informed, balanced and structured written arguments, demonstrating their depth and breadth of understanding of vocation
  • engage with questions of belief, value, meaning, purpose, truth, and their influence on human life

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to [the ideas of/the texts/the concepts/ the composites]:

  • The Bible
  • The Catechism of the Catholic Church

 

 

 

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their knowledge of vocation by summative assessment and project work.  The summative assessment will assess:

  1. Knowledge of Religious Orders
  2. Knowledge of missionary work
  3. Knowledge of marriage as a vocation
  4. Knowledge of the SVP
  5. Knowledge of the golden rule
  6. Evaluation of the teachings from the Sermon on the Mount

Pupils will know: The life and teachings of Jesus through the study of Mark’s Gospel

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to:

  • develop their knowledge and understanding of Christian beliefs, teachings, and sources of wisdom and authority, including through their reading of Mark’s Gospel.
  • develop their ability to construct well-argued, well-informed, balanced and structured written arguments, demonstrating their depth and breadth of understanding of Mark’s Gospel
  • engage with questions of belief, value, meaning, purpose, truth, and their influence on human life

 

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to [the ideas of/the texts/the concepts/ the composites]:

  • The Bible
  • The Catechism of the Catholic Church

 

 

 

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their knowledge of Mark’s Gospel by summative assessment and project work.  The summative assessment will assess:

  1. Knowledge of the theme of discipleship in Mark’s Gospel
  2. Knowledge of the theme of the Kingdom of God in Mark’s Gospel
  3. Knowledge of the background to Mark’s Gospel
  4. Knowledge of how Holy Week is portrayed in Mark’s Gospel
  5. Knowledge of how the Resurrection is portrayed in Mark’s Gospel
  6. Evaluation of the theme of Messiahship in Mark’s Gospel

Pupils will know: Diverse beliefs on the existence of God, particularly in relation to evil and suffering, responses to unanswered prayers and how the media portrays a belief in God.

 

Pupils will be able to:

  • develop their knowledge and understanding of religious and non-religious beliefs, teachings, and sources of wisdom and authority, including through their reading of key religious texts.
  • develop their ability to construct well-argued, well-informed, balanced and structured written arguments, demonstrating their depth and breadth of understanding of the philosophical arguments around the existence of God
  • engage with questions of belief, value, meaning, purpose, truth, and their influence on human life

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to [the ideas of/the texts/the concepts/ the composites]:

  • The Bible
  • The Catechism of the Catholic Church
  • The Theodicies of Augustine and Irenaeus

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their knowledge of the philosophical arguments surrounding the existence of God by summative assessment and project work.  The summative assessment will assess:

  1. Knowledge of the problem of evil
  2. Knowledge of the problem of unanswered prayer
  3. Knowledge of the Cosmological argument
  4. Knowledge of Teleological argument
  5. Knowledge of the impact of religious upbringing
  6. Evaluation of the impact of the media on religious belief

Literacy

Key terms:

  • Buddha
  • Bodhisattva
  • Enlightenment
  • Nirvana
  • Dukkha
  • Dharma
  • Anatta
  • Anicca
  • Karma
  • Sangha
  • Mahayana

 

 

 

 

 

Reading opportunities:

The Tipitaka

Literacy

Key terms:

  • Dignity
  • Sanctity of life
  • abortion
  • contraception
  • euthanasia
  • Divine
  • bullying
  • Justice
  • injustice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading opportunities:

The Bible

The Catechism of the Catholic Church

Literacy

Key terms:

  • Gurdwara
  • Guru Granth Sahib
  • Guru Nanak
  • Khalsa
  • Khanda
  • Langar
  • Mool Mantar
  • Sewa
  • Sikh
  • Weheguru

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading opportunities:

The Guru Granth Sahib

The teachings of the Gurus

Literacy

Key terms:

  • Active life
  • Charity
  • contemplative life
  • displaying religion
  • the evangelical counsels
  • holy orders
  • hypocrite
  • the Law of Moses
  • the monastic life
  • religious community
  • the Sermon on the Mount
  • vocation
  • laity.

 

Reading opportunities:

The Bible

The Catechism of the Catholic Church

Literacy

Key terms:

  • Gospel
  • Biography
  • New Testament
  • Tradition
  • Disciple
  • Messiah
  • Christ
  • Miracle
  • Parable
  • Discipleship

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading opportunities:

The Bible

Mark’s Gospel

The Catechism of the Catholic Church

Literacy

Key terms:

  • Agnosticism
  • Atheism
  • Conversion
  • Free Will
  • Miracle
  • Moral Evil
  • Natural Evil
  • Numinous
  • Omni-Benevolent
  • Omnipotent
  • Omniscient
  • Prayer 

 

 

 

 

Reading opportunities:

The Bible

The Catechism of the Catholic Church

Connections

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:

Geography – Countries in the Far East

 

Connections

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:

Science – Genetic Engineering, Medical Science

Connections

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:

History – Immigration and UK

Geography – Countries in the Far East – India and Pakistan

 

Connections

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:

Geography – LEDCs

Connections

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:

English Literature – Study of a text, themes, writing for an audience

Geography – Countries in the Middle East

Connections

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:

Science – Big Bang Theory, Theory of Evolution

History – Modern Day Conflict

Geography – LEDCs, MEDCs

Learning at home

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by producing a range of RE activities. This may include short or extended piece of writing, research into a topic or issue, and regular testing on pupil knowledge of RE key words/vocab. 

Learning at home

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by producing a range of RE activities. This may include short or extended piece of writing, research into a topic or issue, and regular testing on pupil knowledge of RE key words/vocab. 

Learning at home

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by producing a range of RE activities. This may include short or extended piece of writing, research into a topic or issue, and regular testing on pupil knowledge of RE key words/vocab. 

Learning at home

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by producing a range of RE activities. This may include short or extended piece of writing, research into a topic or issue, and regular testing on pupil knowledge of RE key words/vocab. 

Learning at home

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by producing a range of RE activities. This may include short or extended piece of writing, research into a topic or issue, and regular testing on pupil knowledge of RE key words/vocab. 

Learning at home

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by producing a range of RE activities. This may include short or extended piece of writing, research into a topic or issue, and regular testing on pupil knowledge of RE key words/vocab. 

Sequencing

We have chosen this method of sequencing in Year 9 because it gives students the opportunity to really delve into the teachings that they have been studying in their previous religious studies and apply the moral principles to modern day issues, such as Medical Ethics as well as philosophical concepts such as the existence of God and a sense of Vocation for all.  There is also time given to reflective theology and philosophy through the study of Buddhism and the study of the life of Jesus as told by St Mark.

It builds on the work done in Year 8 by taking all the Biblical and religious scripture they have learnt and developing their ability to apply and analyse its use in modern day issues.

It leads to the work that will be done in Year 10 by developing the students’ ability to evaluate, analyse and provide independent, well-informed, and highly reasoned insights into their own and others’ religious beliefs and world views.

 

 

YEAR GROUP PLANS

Year 10

Term 1 – Catholic Beliefs and Teachings

Term 2 – Catholic Practices

Term 3 – Catholic Sources of Wisdom and Authority

Term 4 – Catholic Forms of Expression and Ways of Life

Term 5 – Jewish Beliefs and Teachings

Term 6 – Jewish Practices

Pupils will know:

  • The Trinity: the nature and significance of the Trinity as expressed in the Nicene Creed; the nature and significance of the oneness of God; the nature and significance of each of the Persons individually: God as the Father, Son and Holy Spirit; how this is reflected in worship and belief in the life of a Catholic today.
  • Biblical understandings of God as a Trinity of Persons: the nature and significance of God as a Trinity of Persons, including reference to the baptism of Jesus (Matthew 3: 13–17) and historical development of the doctrine of the Trinity, including reference to the First Council of Nicaea and the First Council of Constantinople.
  • Creation: the nature and significance of the biblical account of Creation, including Genesis 1–3; and how it may be understood in divergent ways in Christianity, including reference to literal and metaphorical interpretations; the significance of the Creation account for Catholics in understanding the nature and characteristics of God, especially as Creator, benevolent, omnipotent and eternal.
  • The significance of the Creation account in understanding the nature of humanity: the nature and significance of the nature of humanity being created in the image of God, including reference to Genesis 1–3 and divergent understandings of humanity’s relationship with Creation (dominion and stewardship); the implications of these beliefs for Catholics today.
  • The Incarnation: Jesus as incarnate Son, the divine Word, including John 1, both fully God and fully human; the scriptural origins of this belief, including John 1:1–18 and its importance for Catholics today.
  • The events in the Paschal Mystery: Catholic teachings about the life, death, resurrection and ascension of Jesus, including reference to Luke 24; the redemptive efficacy of these events and their significance for Catholics today.
  • The significance of the life, death, resurrection and ascension of Jesus for Catholic beliefs about salvation and grace, including John 3:10–21 and Acts 4:8–12; the implications and significance of these events for Catholic practice today.
  • Catholic beliefs about eschatology: life after death; the nature of resurrection, judgment, heaven, hell and purgatory, including reference to John 11:17–27 and 2 Corinthians 5:1–10; divergent Christian beliefs about life after death, with reference to purgatory and the nature of resurrection; why belief in life after death is important for Catholics today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to:

  • develop their knowledge and understanding of religions and non-religious beliefs, such as atheism and humanism
  • develop their knowledge and understanding of religious beliefs, teachings, and sources of wisdom and authority, including through their reading of key religious texts, other texts, and scriptures of the religions they are studying
  • develop their ability to construct well-argued, well-informed, balanced and structured written arguments, demonstrating their depth and breadth of understanding of the subject
  • engage with questions of belief, value, meaning, purpose, truth, and their influence on human life
  • reflect on and develop their own values, beliefs and attitudes in the light of what they have learnt and will contribute to their preparation for adult life in a pluralistic society and global community
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of two religions
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of key sources of wisdom and authority including scripture and/or sacred texts, where appropriate, which support contemporary religious faith
  • understand the influence of religion on individuals, communities and societies
  • understand significant common and divergent views between and/or within religions and beliefs
  • apply knowledge and understanding to analyse questions related to religious beliefs and values
  • construct well-informed and balanced arguments on matters concerned with religious beliefs and values.

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to [the ideas of/the texts/the concepts/ the composites]:

  • The Bible
  • The Catechism of the Catholic Church
  • Teachings of other denominations, religions and non-religious beliefs, such as atheism and humanism

 

 

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their knowledge, understanding and evaluation of Catholic beliefs and teachings by summative assessment.  The summative assessment will assess:

  1. Knowledge of the religious traditions of Great Britain
  2. Understanding of the Incarnation
  3. Understanding and use of evidence regarding the Trinity
  4. Evaluation of Eschatological beliefs

 

Pupils will know:

  • The sacramental nature of reality: Catholic teachings about how the whole of creation manifests the presence of God; the meaning and effects of each of the seven sacraments, including Catechism of the Catholic Church 1210–1211; the practice and symbolism of each sacrament; how sacraments communicate the grace of God; divergent Christian attitudes to sacraments, including reference to Orthodox and Protestant Christianity. 
  • Liturgical worship within Catholic Christianity: the nature and significance of the Mass for Catholics, including its structure and the Eucharist as the ‘source and summit of Christian life’, with reference to Lumen Gentium paragraph 7; divergent Christian attitudes towards the practice and meaning of liturgical worship, including its significance for Catholics and the less structured worship in evangelical Christian denominations.
  • The funeral rite as a liturgical celebration of the Church: practices associated with the funeral rite in the home, the church and the cemetery, including reference to 'Preparing my funeral' by Vincent Nichols, Archbishop of Westminster; the aims of the funeral rite, including communion with the deceased; the communion of the community and the proclamation of eternal life to the community and its significance for Catholics.
  • Prayer as the ‘raising of hearts and minds to God’: the nature and significance of different types of prayer; the Lord’s Prayer, including Matthew 6:5–14, set (formulaic) prayers and informal (extempore) prayer; when each type might be used and why; the importance of prayer and the importance for Catholics of having different types of worship.
  • The role and importance of forms of popular piety: the nature and significance of the Rosary, Eucharistic adoration and Stations of the Cross; how each of these might be used and why; the importance of having different types of worship for Catholics including reference to Catechism of the Catholic Church 1674–1676; divergent Christian attitudes to these forms of piety.
  • Pilgrimage: the nature, history and purpose of Catholic pilgrimage; the significance of the places people go on pilgrimage; divergent Christian understandings about whether pilgrimage is important for Christians today, with specific reference to Jerusalem, Lourdes, Rome, Walsingham and the Catechism of the Catholic Church 2691–2696.
  • Catholic Social Teaching: how Catholic Social Teaching reflects the teaching to show love of neighbour; Catholic teaching on justice, peace and reconciliation, Evangelii Gaudium paragraphs 182–237 - The inclusion of the poor in society; How these teachings might be reflected in the lives of individual Catholics including reference to Matt 25: 31 –46 (sheep and goats); the work of CAFOD, what it does and why.
  • Catholic mission and evangelism: the history and significance of mission and evangelism for Catholics; divergent ways this is put into practice by the Church and individual Catholics locally, nationally and globally, and how this fulfils the commission of Jesus and teachings of the Church, including Evangelii Gaudium Chapter 5.

 

Pupils will be able to:

  • develop their knowledge and understanding of religions and non-religious beliefs, such as atheism and humanism
  • develop their knowledge and understanding of religious beliefs, teachings, and sources of wisdom and authority, including through their reading of key religious texts, other texts, and scriptures of the religions they are studying
  • develop their ability to construct well-argued, well-informed, balanced and structured written arguments, demonstrating their depth and breadth of understanding of the subject
  • engage with questions of belief, value, meaning, purpose, truth, and their influence on human life
  • reflect on and develop their own values, beliefs and attitudes in the light of what they have learnt and will contribute to their preparation for adult life in a pluralistic society and global community
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of two religions
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of key sources of wisdom and authority including scripture and/or sacred texts, where appropriate, which support contemporary religious faith
  • understand the influence of religion on individuals, communities and societies
  • understand significant common and divergent views between and/or within religions and beliefs
  • apply knowledge and understanding to analyse questions related to religious beliefs and values
  • construct well-informed and balanced arguments on matters concerned with religious beliefs and values.

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to [the ideas of/the texts/the concepts/ the composites]:

  • The Bible
  • The Catechism of the Catholic Church
  • Teachings of other denominations, religions and non-religious beliefs, such as atheism and humanism

 

 

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their knowledge, understanding and evaluation of Catholic practices by summative assessment.  The summative assessment will assess:

  1. Knowledge of the sacrament of Reconciliation
  2. Knowledge of different forms of worship within Christianity
  3. Understanding and use of evidence regarding the work of Christians for peace
  4. Evaluation of the importance of prayer

Pupils will know:

  • The Bible: the development and structure of the Bible as the revealed Word of God: the origins, structure and different literary forms of the Bible: Old Testament: law, history, prophets, writings; and New Testament: gospels, letters; including divergent Christian understandings about which books should be within the Bible with reference to the Council of Trent.
  • Interpretation of the Bible: Catholic interpretation of the Bible and understanding of the meaning of inspiration; divergent interpretations of the authority of the Bible within Christianity: the literal Word of God, the revealed Word of God and as source of guidance and teaching, including 2 Timothy 3:16 and Catechism of the Catholic Church 105–108; the implications of this for Catholics today.
  • The magisterium of the Church: the meaning, function and importance of the magisterium both conciliar and pontifical with reference to Catechism of the Catholic Church 100; the magisterium as the living teaching office of the Church and authentic interpreter of the affirmations of Scripture and Tradition, and why they are important for Catholics today.
  • The Second Vatican Council: the nature, history and importance of the council; the nature and significance of the four key documents for the Church and for Catholic living: Dei Verbum, Lumen Gentium, Sacrosanctum Concilium and Gaudium et Spes
  • The Church as the Body of Christ and the People of God: the nature and significance of the Church as the Body of Christ and the People of God, including Romans 12:4–6 and 1 Corinthians 12; why the Church as the Body of Christ and the People of God is important for Catholics today; divergent Christian attitudes towards these.
  • The meaning of the four marks of the Church: the nature of the Church as one, holy, catholic and apostolic including reference to the Nicene Creed and the First Council of Constantinople; how the marks may be understood in divergent ways within Christianity; why they are important for Catholics today
  • Mary as a model of the Church: the significance of Mary as a model of the Church – joined with Christ in the work of salvation, as a model of discipleship and as a model of faith and charity, including Luke 1:26–39 and Catechism of the Catholic Church 963–975; the implications of this teaching for Catholic life today.
  • Sources of personal and ethical decision making: the example and teaching of Jesus as the authoritative source for moral teaching; Jesus as fulfilment of the Law, including Matthew 5:17–24; divergent understandings of the place and authority of natural law; virtue and the primacy of conscience; the divergent implications of these sources of authority for Christians today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to:

  • develop their knowledge and understanding of religions and non-religious beliefs, such as atheism and humanism
  • develop their knowledge and understanding of religious beliefs, teachings, and sources of wisdom and authority, including through their reading of key religious texts, other texts, and scriptures of the religions they are studying
  • develop their ability to construct well-argued, well-informed, balanced and structured written arguments, demonstrating their depth and breadth of understanding of the subject
  • engage with questions of belief, value, meaning, purpose, truth, and their influence on human life
  • reflect on and develop their own values, beliefs and attitudes in the light of what they have learnt and will contribute to their preparation for adult life in a pluralistic society and global community
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of two religions
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of key sources of wisdom and authority including scripture and/or sacred texts, where appropriate, which support contemporary religious faith
  • understand the influence of religion on individuals, communities and societies
  • understand significant common and divergent views between and/or within religions and beliefs
  • apply knowledge and understanding to analyse questions related to religious beliefs and values
  • construct well-informed and balanced arguments on matters concerned with religious beliefs and values.

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to [the ideas of/the texts/the concepts/ the composites]:

  • The Bible
  • The Catechism of the Catholic Church
  • Teachings of other denominations, religions and non-religious beliefs, such as atheism and humanism

 

 

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their knowledge, understanding and evaluation of Catholic sources of wisdom and authority by summative assessment.  The summative assessment will assess:

  1. Knowledge of the Bible
  2. Understanding of the Church as apostolic
  3. Understanding and use of evidence regarding the use of conscience
  4. Evaluation of the importance of the Bible

 

Pupils will know:

  • The common and divergent forms of architecture, design and decoration of Catholic churches: how they reflect belief, are used in, and contribute to, worship, including reference to the Catechism of the Catholic Church 1179–1181.
  • The different internal features of a Catholic church including reference to Catechism of the Catholic Church 1182–1186: the meaning and significance of the lectern, altar, crucifix and tabernacle and how they express the importance of redemption and facilitate Catholic worship.
  • The meaning and significance of sacred objects, including sacred vessels, sarcophagi, and hunger cloths within Catholicism: the way these are used to express belief, including Catechism of the Catholic Church 1161, and the divergent ways in which they may be used in church and other settings.
  • The meaning and significance of paintings, fresco and drawings within Catholicism with reference to two specific pieces and Catechism of the Catholic Church 2502 – 2503: the divergent ways these are used to express belief by the artist and those who observe the art, and the divergent ways in which paintings, frescos and drawings may be used in church and other settings.
  • The meaning and significance of sculpture and statues with reference to Catechism of the Catholic Church 2501: the way these are used to express belief by the artist and those who observe the art, the way these are used to express belief, and the divergent ways in which how sculptures and statues may be used in church and other settings.
  • The purpose and use of symbolism and imagery in religious art: the cross, crucifix, fish, Chi-Rho, dove, including Catechism of the Catholic Church 701, Eagle, Alpha and Omega, symbols of the four evangelists; the way this symbolism is used to express belief, and the divergent ways in which they may be used in church and other settings.
  • The meaning and significance of drama: mystery plays, passion plays; the way drama is used to express belief with reference to Catechism of the Catholic Church 2567, and the divergent ways in which drama may be used in church and other settings.
  • The nature and use of traditional and contemporary styles of music in worship: hymns, plainchant, psalms and worship songs including reference to Catechism of the Catholic Church 2641; the way different music is used to express belief and the divergent ways in which it may be used in church (including the Mass) and other settings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to:

  • develop their knowledge and understanding of religions and non-religious beliefs, such as atheism and humanism
  • develop their knowledge and understanding of religious beliefs, teachings, and sources of wisdom and authority, including through their reading of key religious texts, other texts, and scriptures of the religions they are studying
  • develop their ability to construct well-argued, well-informed, balanced and structured written arguments, demonstrating their depth and breadth of understanding of the subject
  • engage with questions of belief, value, meaning, purpose, truth, and their influence on human life
  • reflect on and develop their own values, beliefs and attitudes in the light of what they have learnt and will contribute to their preparation for adult life in a pluralistic society and global community
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of two religions
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of key sources of wisdom and authority including scripture and/or sacred texts, where appropriate, which support contemporary religious faith
  • understand the influence of religion on individuals, communities and societies
  • understand significant common and divergent views between and/or within religions and beliefs
  • apply knowledge and understanding to analyse questions related to religious beliefs and values
  • construct well-informed and balanced arguments on matters concerned with religious beliefs and values.

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to [the ideas of/the texts/the concepts/ the composites]:

  • The Bible
  • The Catechism of the Catholic Church
  • Teachings of other denominations, religions and non-religious beliefs, such as atheism and humanism

 

 

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their knowledge, understanding and evaluation of Catholic forms and expression and ways of life by summative assessment.  The summative assessment will assess:

  1. Knowledge of the features of a Catholic church
  2. Understanding of the use of Hunger Cloths
  3. Understanding and use of evidence regarding the use of music in worship
  4. Evaluation of the importance of artwork in worship

 

Pupils will know:

  • The nature of the Almighty: how the characteristics of the Almighty are shown in the Torah, and why they are important in Jewish life today, including One, Creator, Law-Giver and Judge, including reference to Genesis 2.
  • The nature and importance of Shekinah: how the divine presence is shown in the Torah and why it is important, including interpretations of 2 Chronicles 7:1–3; the divergent understandings of shekinah found in different forms of Orthodox Judaism and the importance of them for Jews today.
  • The nature and purpose of the Messiah: how messiahship is shown in the scriptures including Jeremiah 23:5–8; the nature and significance of the Messianic Age and the Jewish responsibility to bring it about; divergent understandings of the Messiah in different forms of Orthodox and Reform Judaism and the importance of them for Jewish people today.
  • The Covenant at Sinai: the nature and history of the Covenant at Sinai (the Ten Commandments), including Exodus 20; the role and significance of Moses in the Covenant at Sinai; divergent understandings of how and why the Decalogue is important in Jewish life today.
  • The covenant with Abraham and his descendants: the nature and history of the Abrahamic covenant; the role of Abraham in the covenant, including Genesis 17; why the Promised Land covenanted to Abraham and his descendants is important for Jews today.
  • Sanctity of life: the nature and importance of Pikuach Nefesh (primacy of life); why human life is holy by Jewish people; how life is shown as special and taking precedence over everything, including Talmud Yoma 83–84; divergent understandings of how and why the principle of Pikuach Nefesh is applied by Jews today.
  • Moral principles and the Mitzvot: the nature and importance of the Mitzvot, including reference to the Mishnah Torah of Maimonides: Sefer Madda; the importance of the relationship between keeping the Mitzvot and free will; the Mitzvot between humans and the Almighty, and between humans; divergent understandings of the importance of the Mitzvot between the Almighty and humans, and between humans, for Jewish life today.
  • Jewish beliefs about life after death: divergent Jewish understandings of the nature and significance of life after death, including reference to different forms of Orthodox and Reform Judaism; Jewish teachings about life after death, including interpretations of Ecclesiastes 12; the nature of resurrection and judgement; why belief in life after death may be important for Jews today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to:

  • develop their knowledge and understanding of religions and non-religious beliefs, such as atheism and humanism
  • develop their knowledge and understanding of religious beliefs, teachings, and sources of wisdom and authority, including through their reading of key religious texts, other texts, and scriptures of the religions they are studying
  • develop their ability to construct well-argued, well-informed, balanced and structured written arguments, demonstrating their depth and breadth of understanding of the subject
  • engage with questions of belief, value, meaning, purpose, truth, and their influence on human life
  • reflect on and develop their own values, beliefs and attitudes in the light of what they have learnt and will contribute to their preparation for adult life in a pluralistic society and global community
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of two religions
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of key sources of wisdom and authority including scripture and/or sacred texts, where appropriate, which support contemporary religious faith
  • understand the influence of religion on individuals, communities and societies
  • understand significant common and divergent views between and/or within religions and beliefs
  • apply knowledge and understanding to analyse questions related to religious beliefs and values
  • construct well-informed and balanced arguments on matters concerned with religious beliefs and values.

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to [the ideas of/the texts/the concepts/ the composites]:

  • The Tanakh
  • The Talmud
  • The Bible
  • The Catechism of the Catholic Church
  • Teachings of other denominations, religions and non-religious beliefs, such as atheism and humanism

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their knowledge, understanding and evaluation of Jewish beliefs and teachings by summative assessment.  The summative assessment will assess:

  1. Knowledge of the characteristics of the Almighty
  2. Understanding of the shekinah
  3. Understanding and use of evidence regarding the covenant with Abraham
  4. Evaluation of the importance of Pikuach Nefesh

 

Pupils will know:

  • The nature and purpose of Jewish public acts of worship: the nature, features and purpose of Jewish public worship, including interpretations of Psalm 116:12–19; the nature, features and importance of synagogue services for the Jewish community and the individual.
  • The Tanakh and the Talmud: the nature, features, purpose and significance of the Tanakh (the written law) and Talmud (the oral law) for Jews in daily life today, with reference to Perkei Avot 2; the nature and purpose of Jewish laws: food laws, kashrut, including kosher, and treifah and the separation of dairy and meat, including reference to Deuteronomy 14:3–10; the divergent implications of the Jewish food laws for Jews today.
  • The nature and purpose of prayer in the home and of private prayer: the nature, features and purpose of prayer three times a day; the importance of having different forms of prayers, including interpretations of Psalm 55:16–23.
  • The nature and importance of the Shema and the Amidah (the standing prayer); when the Shema and the Amidah might be used, how and why, including reference to the Mezuzah; the importance of having the Shema and the Amidah for Jews today, including reference to Deuteronomy 6:4.
  • The importance of ritual for Jews today: the nature, features and purpose of the birth, marriage, Bar and Bat Mitzvah ceremonies, including interpretations of Genesis 21:1–8 and Leviticus 12; the nature, purpose and importance of mourning ceremonies; the distinct importance of the funeral, Shiva, avelut and yahrzeit for Jews today; divergent understandings of the importance of each ritual for different forms of Orthodox and Reform Judaism today.
  • The nature, features, history and purpose of celebrating Shabbat: the nature, features and purpose of the celebration of Shabbat in the home and in the synagogue, including interpretations of Exodus 31:12–18; why the celebration of Shabbat is important for the Jewish community and the individual today.
  • Jewish festivals: the nature, history, purpose and significance of Jewish festivals; the origins and meaning of specific festivals, including Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, Pesach, Shavuot and Sukkot, including interpretations of Leviticus 23 (Rosh Hashanah); divergent understandings of why festivals are important to different forms of Orthodox and Reform Judaism today.
  • Features of the synagogue: the nature, history and purpose of the different design of the synagogues in Liberal, Reform and Orthodox Judaism, including facing Jerusalem, layout of seating the Ark and the bimah and with reference to Proverbs 14:28; how and why the synagogue is used by the different communities, including reference to Exodus 27:20–21; how and why objects of devotion are use within the synagogues, including a yad, Torah Scroll, ner tamid and menorah.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to:

  • develop their knowledge and understanding of religions and non-religious beliefs, such as atheism and humanism
  • develop their knowledge and understanding of religious beliefs, teachings, and sources of wisdom and authority, including through their reading of key religious texts, other texts, and scriptures of the religions they are studying
  • develop their ability to construct well-argued, well-informed, balanced and structured written arguments, demonstrating their depth and breadth of understanding of the subject
  • engage with questions of belief, value, meaning, purpose, truth, and their influence on human life
  • reflect on and develop their own values, beliefs and attitudes in the light of what they have learnt and will contribute to their preparation for adult life in a pluralistic society and global community
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of two religions
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of key sources of wisdom and authority including scripture and/or sacred texts, where appropriate, which support contemporary religious faith
  • understand the influence of religion on individuals, communities and societies
  • understand significant common and divergent views between and/or within religions and beliefs
  • apply knowledge and understanding to analyse questions related to religious beliefs and values
  • construct well-informed and balanced arguments on matters concerned with religious beliefs and values.

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to [the ideas of/the texts/the concepts/ the composites]:

  • The Tanakh
  • The Talmud
  • The Bible
  • The Catechism of the Catholic Church
  • Teachings of other denominations, religions and non-religious beliefs, such as atheism and humanism

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their knowledge, understanding and evaluation of Jewish practices by summative assessment.  The summative assessment will assess:

  1. Knowledge of Shavuot
  2. Understanding of Jewish dietary laws
  3. Understanding and use of evidence regarding Brit Milah
  4. Evaluation of the importance of the Amidah

 

Literacy

Key terms:

Monotheism

Creed

Catholic Catechism

Sacraments

Apostolic tradition

Trinity

Icon

Ministry of Jesus

Heresies

Adoptionism

Arianism

Church Councils

Consubstantial

The Bible

Nicene Creed

Genesis

Original Sin

Dominion

Fundamental Protestants

Creator

Benevolence

Omnipotent

Ex Nihlo

Self-knowledge

Human dignity

Stewardship/Christian Stewardship

Moral Imperatives

Made in the image of God

Incarnation

Gospel

Virgin birth

Salvation

The Paschal Mystery

Maundy Thursday

Prophesied

Sanhedrin

Blasphemy

Treason

Tomb

Good Friday

Anoint

Salvation history

Ascension

Salvation

Sin

Original Sin

Grace

Charisms

Reconciliation

Heaven

Hell

Purgatory

Resurrection

Soul

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading opportunities:

The Bible

The Catechism of the Catholic Church

Literacy

Key terms:

Grace

Penance

Form

Matter

Initiation

Chrism

Contrition

Precepts of the Church

Absolution

Matrimony

Nuptial blessing

Consecrated

Ordination

Chalice

Paten

Concelebrate

Host

Lectionary

Liturgical year

Penitential Rite

Liturgy

Eucharist

Transubstantiation

Tabernacle

Mass

Vigil

Committal Interment

Vocal Prayer

Meditation

Contemplation

Adoration

Thanksgiving

Confession

Supplication

Extempore

Prayer

Decades

Blessed Sacrament

Monstrance

Holy Hour

Nave

Eucharistic adoration

The Rosary

The Stations of the cross

Popular Piety

Pilgrimage

Relics

Shrine

Cenacle

Via Dolorose

Basilicas

Immaculate conception

Cardinal virtues

Reconciliation

Encyclical

Vocation

LEDCs

MEDCs

Evangelism

Great Commission

Alpha

Mission metropolis

Catechetical programmes

Seminaries

Proselytism

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading opportunities:

The Bible

The Catechism of the Catholic Church

Literacy

Key terms:

The Bible

Old Testament

New Testament

Biblia

Berith

Covenant

Torah

Messiah

Dead sea scrolls

Prophecy

Apocalyptic

Gospel

Synoptic

Canon

Rylands fragment

Fundamentalist

Liberal

Lectio Divina

Magisterium

Conciliar

Pontifical

Papal infallibility

Sola Scriptura

Assumption of Mary

Ex Cathedra

Apostolic Succession

Council

Aggiornamento

Pilgrim people

Common Priesthood

Vernacular

Separated brethren

People

Apostolic

Sister Churches

Ecumenical

Catholic

Eastern Rite

Shrine

Ark

Theotokos

Assumption

Immaculate conception

Annunciation

Golden rule

Torah

Natural law

Conscience

Interiority

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading opportunities:

The Bible

The Catechism of the Catholic Church

Literacy

Key terms:

Gothic

Baroque

Narthex

Nave

Sanctuary

Lectern

Tabernacle

Lady chapel

Madonna

Icon

Rood screen

Iconostasis

Holy of Holies

Consecrated

Blessed Sacrament

Ambo

Psalm

Acolyte

Eucharistic prayer

Altar

Transubstantiation

Monstrance

Paten

ciborium

Chalice

Stoup

Alb

Stole

Chasuble

Sarcophagus

Votive Candles

Fresco

Friar

Halo

Shroud

Tilma

Sacred Heart

Apparitions

Pieta

Basilica

Keys to the kingdom

Alpha and Omega

Ichthus

Chi-Rho

Evangelist

Mystery play

Harrowing of hell

Passion plays

Passion

Veneration of the cross

Plainchant

Sistrum

Worship song

Ecumenical

Doxology

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading opportunities:

The Bible

The Catechism of the Catholic Church

Literacy

Key terms:

Tanakh

Torah

Nevi ’im

Ketuvium

Shema

Mezuzah

Tefillin

Thirteen principals of faith

Maimonides

Covenant

Mitzvot

Halakhah

Temple

Mount Zion

Talmud

Kabbalah

Hashem

Immutable

Messianic Age

Inspired

Exile

Sanctuary

Exodus

Ark of the Covenant

Gentiles

Decalogue

Shabbat

Canaan

Ishmael

Isaac

Brit Milah

Mohel

Brit Shalom

Brit Chayim

Talmud

Desecrate

Yom Kippur

Sanctity of Life

Mitzvot

Oral Torah

 Halakhah

Mishnah

Mitzvot

Chukim

Kosher

Patriarchs

Gan Eden

Gehinnom

Mishnah Torah

Tosefta

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading opportunities:

The Tanakh

The Talmud

The Bible

The Catechism of the Catholic Church

Literacy

Key terms:

Homage

Reverence

Deity

Minyan

Shabbat

Rabbits

Kiddush

Sofer Torah

Ark

Bimah

Sidra

Rosh Hashanah

Ellul

Sofar

Yom Kippur

Simchat Torah

Purim

Torah

Nevi ’im

Ketuvim

Patriarchs

Halakhah

Mishnah

Haftarot

Kosher

Treifah

Shechitah

Shochet

Hechsher

Siddur

Mezuzah

Shacharit

Minchah

Arvit

Tefillin

Tallit

Amidah

Minyan

Shema

Ethical Monotheism

Amidah

Brit Milah

Kvatters

Kvatters

Sandek

Mohel

Halakhah

Sanctify

Huppah

Keuban

Bar Mitzvah

Tefillin

Midrash

Bat Brit

Mishnah Shabbat

Challot

Havdalah

Sefer Torah

Sidra

Shofar

Book of Life

Tashlich

Days of Awe

Kol

Nidrei

Etrog

Lulav

Seder

Hagadah

Shul

Menorah

Aron Hakodesh

Yad

Bimah

Chazzan

Ner Tamud

Synagogue

 

Reading opportunities:

The Tanakh

The Talmud

The Bible

The Catechism of the Catholic Church

Connections

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:

History – 1st Century

Geography – Middle East, Europe

Connections

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:

Geography – Middle East, Europe

Connections

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:

English Literacy – Writing Styles, Biography, Poetry, Letters, Persuasive Writing

Connections

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:

Art – Statues, Sculptures, Art in Worship

Music – Worship Songs, Traditional Hymns

Performing Arts – Passion Plays, Drama in Worship

Connections

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:

History – Holocaust

Geography – Middle East, Europe

Connections

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:

History – Holocaust

Geography – Middle East, Europe

Food and Science – Dietary Laws/Requirements

Learning at home

There are two Catholic Christianity Workbooks which the department provides for pupils to use over the two-year course.  This covers the essential aspects of the Religious Studies GCSE exam. The workbook is designed to help revise work done at school by strengthening understanding of the topics covered, as well as providing opportunities for pupils to practice the skills learnt.  These resources are broken down into a coherent schedule and are going to be used as their homework activities until the Public Examinations. 

Learning at home

There are two Catholic Christianity Workbooks which the department provides for pupils to use over the two-year course.  This covers the essential aspects of the Religious Studies GCSE exam. The workbook is designed to help revise work done at school by strengthening understanding of the topics covered, as well as providing opportunities for pupils to practice the skills learnt.  These resources are broken down into a coherent schedule and are going to be used as their homework activities until the Public Examinations.

Learning at home

There are two Catholic Christianity Workbooks which the department provides for pupils to use over the two-year course.  This covers the essential aspects of the Religious Studies GCSE exam. The workbook is designed to help revise work done at school by strengthening understanding of the topics covered, as well as providing opportunities for pupils to practice the skills learnt.  These resources are broken down into a coherent schedule and are going to be used as their homework activities until the Public Examinations.

Learning at home

There are two Catholic Christianity Workbooks which the department provides for pupils to use over the two-year course.  This covers the essential aspects of the Religious Studies GCSE exam. The workbook is designed to help revise work done at school by strengthening understanding of the topics covered, as well as providing opportunities for pupils to practice the skills learnt.  These resources are broken down into a coherent schedule and are going to be used as their homework activities until the Public Examinations.

Learning at home

There are two Catholic Christianity Workbooks which the department provides for pupils to use over the two-year course.  This covers the essential aspects of the Religious Studies GCSE exam. The workbook is designed to help revise work done at school by strengthening understanding of the topics covered, as well as providing opportunities for pupils to practice the skills learnt.  These resources are broken down into a coherent schedule and are going to be used as their homework activities until the Public Examinations.

Learning at home

There are two Catholic Christianity Workbooks which the department provides for pupils to use over the two-year course.  This covers the essential aspects of the Religious Studies GCSE exam. The workbook is designed to help revise work done at school by strengthening understanding of the topics covered, as well as providing opportunities for pupils to practice the skills learnt.  These resources are broken down into a coherent schedule and are going to be used as their homework activities until the Public Examinations.

Sequencing

We have chosen this method of sequencing in Year 10 because it provides a clear understanding of the beliefs, teachings, practices and sources of wisdom and authority of the Catholic Church and provides foundations for the study of Jewish beliefs & practices as well as philosophical and ethical debate.

It builds on the work done in Year 9 (previous year) by developing the students’ ability to evaluate, analyse and provide independent, well-informed and highly reasoned insights into their own and others’ religious beliefs and world views.

It leads to the work that will be done in Year 11 (next year) by ensuring students have a clear background understanding of the Catholic Church’s teaching and sources of wisdom and authority

 

 

YEAR GROUP PLANS

Year 11

Term 1 – Arguments for the Existence of God

Term 2 – Religious Teachings on Relationships and Families in the 21st Century

Term 3, 4 and 5 – Revision

Pupils will know:

  • Revelation as proof of the existence of God: the significance of Jesus Christ as the culmination of God’s revelation; what the revelation of Jesus Christ shows about the nature of God for Catholics, including reference to Hebrews 1:1–4.
  • Visions as proof of the existence of God: the nature and importance of visions for Catholics; biblical and non-biblical examples of visions, including Joan of Arc and Genesis 15 and Matthew 17:1–13; reasons why they might lead to belief in God and Catholic responses to non-religious arguments (including atheist and Humanist) which maintain that visions are hallucinations and provide no proof that God exists.
  • Miracles as proof of the existence of God: the nature and importance of miracles for Catholics; biblical and non-biblical examples of miracles, including those at Lourdes and John 4:43–54; reasons why they might lead to belief in God and Catholic responses to non-religious arguments (including atheist and Humanist) which maintain that miracles can be scientifically explained and provide no proof that God exists.
  • Catholic attitudes towards religious experiences and its use as a philosophical argument for the existence of God: the nature of religious experience and why not all religious experiences are approved by the Church, including reference to Catechism of the Catholic Church 66–67; Catholic responses to non-religious (including atheist and Humanist) arguments that religious experiences do not provide proof that God exists.
  • Design argument: the classical design argument for the existence of God and its use by Catholics as a philosophical argument for the existence of God; understandings of what the design argument shows about the nature of God for Catholics including Romans 1:18–24; Catholic responses to non-religious (including atheist and Humanist) arguments against the design argument as evidence for the existence of God.
  • Cosmological argument: the cosmological argument for the existence of God and its use by Catholics as a philosophical argument for the existence of God, including reference to Thomas Aquinas' First Three Ways of showing God's existence; understandings of the nature and importance of what the cosmological argument shows about the nature of God for Catholics; Catholic responses to non-religious (including atheist and Humanist) arguments against the cosmological argument as evidence for the existence of God.
  • Issues raised by the existence of suffering and God as all-loving: the issues it raises for Catholics about the nature of God, including Isaiah 45; how the problem and its basis as a philosophical argument may lead some to examine and others to reject their belief in God.
  • The solutions offered to the problem of suffering and a loving and righteous God within Catholicism: biblical, theoretical and practical responses – Psalms, including reference to Psalm 119, Job, free will (St Augustine), as a way for humans to develop (St Irenaeus), prayer, and charity; divergent understandings within Christianity of their success in solving the problem.

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to:

  • develop their knowledge and understanding of religions and non-religious beliefs, such as atheism and humanism
  • develop their knowledge and understanding of religious beliefs, teachings, and sources of wisdom and authority, including through their reading of key religious texts, other texts, and scriptures of the religions they are studying
  • develop their ability to construct well-argued, well-informed, balanced and structured written arguments, demonstrating their depth and breadth of understanding of the subject
  • engage with questions of belief, value, meaning, purpose, truth, and their influence on human life
  • reflect on and develop their own values, beliefs and attitudes in the light of what they have learnt and will contribute to their preparation for adult life in a pluralistic society and global community
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of two religions
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of key sources of wisdom and authority including scripture and/or sacred texts, where appropriate, which support contemporary religious faith
  • understand the influence of religion on individuals, communities and societies
  • understand significant common and divergent views between and/or within religions and beliefs
  • apply knowledge and understanding to analyse questions related to religious beliefs and values
  • construct well-informed and balanced arguments on matters concerned with religious beliefs and values.

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to [the ideas of/the texts/the concepts/ the composites]:

  • The Bible
  • The Catechism of the Catholic Church
  • The Religious Experiences of significant figures such as Joan of Arc and Bernadette Soubirous
  • The Philosophical Arguments for the Existence of God
  • The Philosophical Arguments surrounding the Problem of Evil
  • The Theodicies of Augustine and Irenaeus

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their knowledge, understanding and evaluation of Catholic beliefs and teachings by summative assessment.  The summative assessment will assess:

  1. Knowledge of the design argument
  2. Understanding of the Catholic responses to the problem of evil
  3. Understanding and use of evidence regarding the importance of miracles for Catholics
  4. Evaluation of Visions as proof of God’s existence

Pupils will know:

  • The importance and purpose of marriage for Catholics: the significance of marriage in Catholic life; Catholic teachings about marriage, including Not Just Good, But Beautiful by Pope Francis; divergent Christian, non-religious (including atheist and Humanist) attitudes to the importance of marriage in society, including the sanctity of marriage, a lack of importance, cohabitation and the Catholic responses to these attitudes.
  • Catholic teaching about the importance of sexual relationships: Catholic teaching about sexual relationships as marital, unitive and procreative, including Catechism of the Catholic Church 2360–2365; Catholic teaching on sexual relationships outside of marriage and homosexuality; divergent Christian, non-religious (including atheist and Humanist) attitudes to sexual relationships, including the acceptance of sexual relationships outside marriage and homosexuality and Catholic responses to them.
  • Catholic teaching about the purpose and importance of the family: Catholic teaching about the purpose and importance of families including procreation; security and education of children; Catholic responses to the different types of family within 21st-century society (nuclear, single parent, same-sex parents, extended and blended families), including Familiaris Consortio, 36-85.
  • Support for the family in the local Catholic parish: how and why the local parish tries to support families, including through family worship, the sacraments, classes for parents, groups for children and counselling, with reference to the Family Group Movement and Catechism of the Catholic Church 2226; the importance of the support of the local parish for Catholic families today.
  • Catholic teaching on family planning and the regulation of births: Catholic teaching about artificial contraception and natural family planning, including reference to Humanae Vitae; divergent Christian, non-religious (including atheist and Humanist) attitudes to family planning, including acceptance of artificial methods of contraception by some Protestant Churches and the application of ethical theories, such as situation ethics, and Catholic responses to them.
  • Catholic teaching about divorce, annulment and remarriage: Catholic teaching on divorce, annulment and remarriage, including Catechism of the Catholic Church 2382–2386; divergent Christian, non-religious (including atheist and Humanist) attitudes to divorce, annulment and remarriage, including the application of ethical theories, such as situation ethics, and Catholic responses to them.
  • Catholic teaching about the equality of men and women in the family: Catholic teaching about the role of men and women in the family with reference to Catechism of the Catholic Church 2207, including the dignity of work within the home; divergent Christian teachings and attitudes about the equality and roles of men and women in the family and Catholic responses to them.
  • Catholic teachings about gender prejudice and discrimination: Catholic opposition to gender prejudice and discrimination, including theology of the body; examples of Catholic opposition to gender prejudice and discrimination, including Catechism of the Catholic Church 1938; divergent Christian attitudes to gender differences, including the role of women in the Church, prejudice and discrimination and Catholic responses to them.

 

Pupils will be able to:

  • develop their knowledge and understanding of religions and non-religious beliefs, such as atheism and humanism
  • develop their knowledge and understanding of religious beliefs, teachings, and sources of wisdom and authority, including through their reading of key religious texts, other texts, and scriptures of the religions they are studying
  • develop their ability to construct well-argued, well-informed, balanced and structured written arguments, demonstrating their depth and breadth of understanding of the subject
  • engage with questions of belief, value, meaning, purpose, truth, and their influence on human life
  • reflect on and develop their own values, beliefs and attitudes in the light of what they have learnt and will contribute to their preparation for adult life in a pluralistic society and global community
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of two religions
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of key sources of wisdom and authority including scripture and/or sacred texts, where appropriate, which support contemporary religious faith
  • understand the influence of religion on individuals, communities and societies
  • understand significant common and divergent views between and/or within religions and beliefs
  • apply knowledge and understanding to analyse questions related to religious beliefs and values
  • construct well-informed and balanced arguments on matters concerned with religious beliefs and values.

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to [the ideas of/the texts/the concepts/ the composites]:

  • The Bible
  • The Catechism of the Catholic Church
  • Familiaris Consortio
  • Humanae Vitae

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will have been assessed on their knowledge, understanding and evaluation of Catholic beliefs and teachings by summative assessment.  The summative assessment will assess:

  1. Knowledge of the purpose of family for Catholics
  2. Understanding of how the Catholic Church supports the family
  3. Understanding and use of evidence regarding the importance of marriage for Catholics
  4. Evaluation of the purpose of sex

Pupils will Revise:

  • Catholic Beliefs and Teachings
  • Catholic Practices
  • Catholic Sources of Wisdom and Authority
  • Catholic Forms of Expression and Ways of Life
  • Judaism Beliefs and Teachings
  • Jewish Practices

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to:

  • Revise all topics covered
  • Practice and moderate past paper questions and example test papers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will have been assessed on all topics by Past Paper PPEs.

Literacy

Key terms:

Natural Revelation

Spiritual

Awe

Vision

Apparitions

Auditory Vision

Nature Miracles

Immaculate Conception

Conversion

Religious Experience

Design

Evolution

Summa Theologica

Thomas Aquinas

Contingent

Numinous

Transcendent

Big Bang

Moral Evil

Natural Suffering

Omnipotent

Omnipresent

Psalms

Theodicy

Freewill

Value or soul Making

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading opportunities:

The Bible

The Catechism of the Catholic Church

Literacy

Key terms:

Lifelong relationship

Faithfulness

Procreation

Adultery

Spouse

Cohabitation

Premarital sex

Homosexuality

Extramarital sex

Procreative sex

Promiscuity

Celibate

Consensual sex

Polygamous

Monogamous

Heterosexual

Remarriage

Diocese

Parish priest

Children’s liturgy

First communion

Clergy

Catechesis

Unitive purpose

Procreative purpose

NFP (natural family planning)

IUD (intrauterine device)

Civil divorce

Consummate

Annulment

Repentance

Custody

Ordination

Ordained

Sex discrimination

Apostles

 

Reading opportunities:

The Bible

The Catechism of the Catholic Church

Literacy

Key terms:

All listed in the document.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading opportunities:

GCSE revision books and resources

Connections

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:

History – 19th Century figures

Connections

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:

Science – Relationships and Sex education

Connections

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:

All listed in the document.

Learning at home

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by…

There are two Catholic Christianity Workbooks which the department provides for pupils to use over the two-year course.  This covers the essential aspects of the Religious Studies GCSE exam. The workbook is designed to help revise work done at school by strengthening understanding of the topics covered, as well as providing opportunities for pupils to practice the skills learnt.  These resources are broken down into a coherent schedule and are going to be used as their homework activities until the Public Examinations.

Learning at home

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by…

There are two Catholic Christianity Workbooks which the department provides for pupils to use over the two-year course.  This covers the essential aspects of the Religious Studies GCSE exam. The workbook is designed to help revise work done at school by strengthening understanding of the topics covered, as well as providing opportunities for pupils to practice the skills learnt.  These resources are broken down into a coherent schedule and are going to be used as their homework activities until the Public Examinations.

Learning at home

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by…

There are two Catholic Christianity Workbooks which the department provides for pupils to use over the two-year course.  This covers the essential aspects of the Religious Studies GCSE exam. The workbook is designed to help revise work done at school by strengthening understanding of the topics covered, as well as providing opportunities for pupils to practice the skills learnt.  These resources are broken down into a coherent schedule and are going to be used as their homework activities until the Public Examinations.

Sequencing

We have chosen this method of sequencing in Year 11 because it completes the course in preparation for the GCSE Exams

It builds on the work done in Year 10 (previous year) by revising all topics following on from the completion of new content.

 

Our Mission and Values

“Therefore learn as if to live forever; live as if to die tomorrow” (St Edmund of Abingdon)

Read Our Values & Ethos Statement

Trust Information

St Edmund's Catholic School is an academy, and part of the Kent Catholic Schools’ Partnership. The Kent Catholic Schools’ Partnership is an exempt charity and a company limited by guarantee registered in England and Wales under company registration number 08176019 at registered address: Barham Court, Teston, Maidstone, Kent, ME18 5BZ. St Edmund's Catholic School is a business name of Kent Catholic Schools’ Partnership.

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