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Curriculum Plan

ENGLISH SUBJECT: 

 

CURRICULUM PLAN 

 

English curriculum intent statement

In English, our intention is to provide our students with the skills and knowledge to think about the different ways in which writers have explored what it means to be human.  We intend to immerse our students in an exploration of literature from a broad range of different literary periods and to expose them to different voices by using a wide variety of imagined realities and real experiences in order to develop an appreciation of reading, writing and use of spoken language.  

 

The National Curriculum 

We have not deviated from the National Curriculum in this subject. 

 

By the end of Key Stage 2 

Expectations for English attainment at the end of KS2 can be found here

 

By the end of Key Stage 3  

Pupils have studied: 

  • Literature from a broad range of literary periods: Greeks; Old and Middle English; Renaissance; Romantic; Victorian; Modern and Contemporary  

They can: 

  • read easily, fluently and with good understanding; 

  • develop the habit of reading widely and often, for both pleasure and information; 

  • acquire a wide vocabulary, an understanding of grammar and knowledge of linguistic conventions for reading, writing and spoken language; 

  • appreciate our rich and varied literary heritage; 

  • write clearly, accurately and coherently, adapting their language and style in and for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences; 

  • use discussion in order to learn; they should be able to elaborate and explain clearly their understanding and ideas; 

  •  are competent in the arts of speaking and listening, making formal presentations, demonstrating to others and participating in debate. 

 

 

SUBJECT KEY CONCEPTS 

 

 

Key Stage 3 and 4 

 

Origins- to understand the origins and purpose of narratives and how they influence our lives and writing. 

Heroism– to understand the concept of heroism and how the hero’s journey can be applied to a range of texts. 

Female Voice- to understand the paternal influence on literature and the development of the female voice and its influence. 

Flawed Characters- to explore how writers have created some of the great flawed characters in literature and to reflect on our own humanity and that of society in this context. 

Love – to explore how writers understand and represent love, its different forms and its importance to human beings. 

Conflict – to explore the ways writers represent to man’s inhumanity to man and attempt to understand this. 

Identity – to understand how writers explore the sense of self and the impact that society has on this. 

Equality – to explore ideas of fairness and hierarchy represented in literature and how challenges are made to inequality. 

Diversity – to explore the diverse nature of humanity  

Faith – to explore the influence of faiths on the nature of humanity 

Pain – to explore the human condition of pain 

Morality – to explore principles concerning the distinction between right and wrong or good and bad behaviour. 

 

CURRICULUM PLAN: KEY STAGE 3 

 

Year 7 - Stories 

Year 8 - Authorial voice 

Year 9 - Analysis 

Knowledge 

 

 

Pupils will know: 

Fiction 

  • Greek Myths and their contexts 

  • Beowulf and its context 

  • The Canterbury Tales and its context 

  • Shakespeare’s a Midsummer Night’s Dream and its context 

  • Coleridge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner and its context 

 

 

Non-Fiction 

  • Pre 1914 travel writing on Athens 

  • Review of the Canterbury Tales  

  • Tabloid article on the existence of fairies 

  • Excerpt of James Cook’s second voyage 

Pupils will know: 

Fiction 

  • Poems from Other- diversity Cultures  

  • Dicken’s A Christmas Carol and its context (Yr 1 of roll out – Beowulf and its context) 

  • Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet and its context 

  • Orwell’s Animal Farm 

 

Non- Fiction 

  • 19th Century newspaper article about London’s poverty 

  • Explanation text of Shakespeare’s sources for Romeo and Juliet 

  • Luther King’s I have a dream speech 

  • Lenin’s speech for revolution 

 

Pupils will know: 

Fiction 

  • WW1 Literature and its context 

  • Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men and its context  

  • Shakespeare’s Macbeth and its context 

  • Modern Novel – Noughts and Crosses, Blackman 

 

 

Non-Fiction 

  • WW1 battlefield description/account 

  • The Great Depression newspaper articles contemporary and in review 

 

 

 

 

We have chosen to teach this knowledge because of the opportunity to expose students to our major concepts and so fulfil our intent: 

  • Origins 

  • Heroism 

  • Love 

  • Flawed Characters 

  • Faith 

 

 

We have chosen to teach this knowledge because of the opportunity to continue to expose students to our major concepts and so fulfil our intent: 

  • Female voice 

  • Identity 

  • Flawed characters  

  • Love 

  • Equality 

  • Conflict 

  • Diversity 

We have chosen to teach this knowledge because of the opportunity to continue to expose students to our major concepts and so fulfil our intent: 

  • Conflict 

  • Female Voice 

  • Identity 

  • Equality 

  • Heroism 

  • Faith 

  • Diversity 

 

We have also chosen to teach this knowledge because: 

  • of the need to provide understanding of the Greeks because of their profound influence on themes and motifs in all Western Literature 

  • of the need to provide understanding of English language development over time 

  • of the joy of storytelling and its essential nature in literature 

  • of the need to provide understanding of Literary Periods and of a chronology 

  • of the need to expose students to different literary forms 

  • of texts links to heroes, villains and magic throughout the year 

  • to introduce archaic language, complex narratives, morality tales 

 

We have also chosen to teach this knowledge because: 

  • of the chance to expose students to intertextuality 

  • of the importance of exposing students to a range of genres and writers’ experiences, especially those of inequality 

  • we want to develop students’ understanding of tragedy, building on what students have already learned in year 7 in simplified form of some myths  in order to begin to master this concept 

  • references to heroes and villains available in chosen text allowing for developing on year 7’s study 

  • to develop further understanding of morality tales 

  • to introduce a complex narration/voice, non linear texts 

  • develop understanding of symbolism 

 

We have also chosen to teach this knowledge because: 

  • it further broadens understanding of literary periods: focusing on those periods that span the 20th Century and allowing the opportunity to reflect on the influences of past periods already studied. 

  • we can continue the concept of tragedy and the mastery of this 

  • of the importance of including literature outside of the British canon  

  • of the importance of including the female author as well as those from other cultures  

  • to provide a range of forms 

  • to begin to prepare for GCSE and meet NC requirement to study a text in depth twice 

  • to provide diversity within our curriculum 

 

 

Reading Skills 

Pupils will be able to develop their reading accuracy.  

  1. Read for meaning and knowledge of plot and character 
  2. Find/ locate key information through skimming and scanning 
  3. Identify writer’s methods  
  4. Explain the effect of language 
  5. Establish comparisons between texts 
  6. Context – explain the historical significance of a text 
  7. Identify structural features 
  8. Identify explicit and implicit information and writer’s purpose 
  9. Identify facts and opinion when reading non-fiction 

Pupils will be able to embed their reading accuracy.  

  1. Read more analytically for meaning and knowledge of plot and character development 

  2. Summarise and synthesise key information (across texts where appropriate) 
  3. Apply appropriate subject terminology 
  4. Explore the effect of language on the reader 
  5. Explore comparisons between texts 
  6. Context – explore the relevance of the historical significance of a text 
  7. Begin analysis of structural features 
  8. Explain explicit and implicit information and writer’s purpose 
  9. Explain and evaluate facts and opinion in non-fiction texts 

Pupils will be able to independently and confidently use reading skills 

  1. Read analytically showing understanding of plot, sequencing, openings, endings, shifts, patterns, character development. 
  2. Summarise and synthesise key information making inferences based on language 
  3. Apply sophisticated subject terminology (see dept ‘big’ features) 
  4. Explore the effect of language on the writer’s intention and the shaping of meaning 
  5. Compare and contrast comparisons of language, structure and form 
  6. Directly evaluate how context shapes the meaning and interpretation of a text 
  7. Make clear links to the development of texts over time 
  8. Analyse explicit and implicit information and writer’s purpose 
  9. Analyse the impact of facts and opinions (as expressed by the writer) in non-fiction texts 

Writing Skills 

Pupils will be able to:  

Develop their writing accuracy.  

  1. Spelling: Pluralisation/High frequency words/Basic keywords – subject specific terminology/Sound out words phonemically  
  2. Vocabulary: Use words with precision/Use and experiment with appropriate vocab choices 
  3. Sentences: Awareness of sentence types: begins to use range/Sentences are clear and lack ambiguity/Awareness of tense: tense use consistent  
  4. Paragraphing: Use paragraphs /Organise ideas into coherent sequences 
  5. Punctuation: Accurate demarcation of sentences including comma and semi-colon use/Apostrophe awareness - begins to use accurately  
  6. Standard English: Vary formality of writing for purpose 
  7. Creative Writing (Writing to Describe/ Narrate): Write a range of narrative and descriptive pieces/Structure a story with beginning, middle, end/Describe character/Use some narrative devices/Experiment with language techniques 
  8. Transactional Writing (Writing to Persuade/ Argue/ Advise): Express personal viewpoint clearly? Appreciate alternative points of view/Use a range of persuasive techniques to support their ideas  
  9. Writing to Analyse: Write analytically about a text - develop use of academic language/Include quotations to support ideas/ Comment on language used by the author 

Pupils will be able to:  

Embed their writing accuracy.  

  1. Spelling: Homophones/Prefixes and suffixes/Complex words/ Complex keywords – subject specific terminology   
  2. Vocabulary: Use complex words/Use synonyms for complex words/Use word class of individual words (ie. determiner, conjunction, preposition etc)  
  3. Sentences: Combine clauses into complex sentences/Explore impact of range of sentence structures/Explore effects of change in tense  
  4. Paragraphing: Explore different ways to paragraph effectively/ Link paragraphs using range of strategies  
  5. Punctuation: Explore use of sophisticated punctuation/ Apostrophe use accurate 
  6. Standard English: Understand/ explore Standard English vs dialect  
  7. Creative Writing (Writing to Describe/ Narrate): Experiment with structural features/Use interesting vocabulary in a precise manner/Use language techniques to create deliberate effects  
  8. Transactional Writing (Writing to Persuade/ Argue/ Advise): Present ideas on topics persuasively/Develop arguments logically/Use techniques effectively/Give written advice – offering alternative options 
  9. Writing to Analyse: Write critical analysis of a range of texts – use academic language/ Analyse language (specific quotes) used by the author to create effects 

Pupils will be able to:  

Independently and confidently use writing skills.  

  1. Spelling: Recognise own strengths and develop strategies to eliminate persistent errors/Highly accurate spelling for all complex words, including subject specific terminology  
  2. Vocabulary: Use complex words with precision/Deliberately use words to provide layers of meaning 
  3. Sentences: Use variety of sentences to create meaning/Integrate speech, references and direct quotations effectively in sentences  
  4. Paragraphing: Use a variety of ways to open, develop, link and complete paragraphs  
  5. Punctuation: Use full range of (sophisticated) punctuation to clarify meaning  
  6. Standard English: Use appropriate formality for each purpose  
  7. Creative Writing (Writing to Describe/ Narrate): Develop imaginative or unusual perspective/Explore different ways to open/ end writing/Develop engaging tone/ writing style (being amusing/ entertaining)  
  8. Transactional Writing (Writing to Persuade/ Argue/ Advise): Present ideas persuasively for different audiences/ Make clear counter-arguments to alternative views/Develop impersonal style  
  9. Writing to Analyse: Analyse a range of texts independently/Select quotations judiciously and embed into analysis 

Spoken Skills 

Pupils will be able to develop their speaking accuracy. 

  1. Use SE talk 
  2.  Recount a story, anecdote, experience  
  3. Structure a presentation so the audience can understand  
  4. Give clear responses to questions  
  5. Explain/justify a point of view 
  6. Recall the main points of a talk  
  7. Participate in class discussions 
  8. Read texts fluently 

Pupils will be able to embed their speaking accuracy. 

  1. Use SE talk to clarify ideas 
  2. Tell a story, anecdote, experience effectively  
  3. Give clear formal presentations 
  4. Give clear explanations/ commentaries in response to questions  
  5. Ask pertinent questions of other viewpoints  
  6. Discuss the impact of the main points of a talk  
  7. Contribute to class activities and help others to participate when appropriate 
  8. Read texts fluently with appropriate tone 

Pupils will be able to independently and confidently use speaking skills. 

  1. Use Standard English to clarify/ explain/ explore ideas  
  2. Develop techniques to make presentations engaging/ dynamic language  
  3. Identify, deliver and discuss key themes/ issues during presentations  
  4. Discuss and evaluate questions in order to arrive at considered viewpoints  
  5. Constructively challenge different viewpoints and perspectives  
  6. Develop and build upon the main points of a talk  
  7. Hypothesise/ speculate/ evaluate/ develop ideas during discussions  
  8. Read texts dynamically to convey action/ character/ atmosphere 

Cultural Capital 

Pupils will all have been exposed to: 

  • Greek literature; ideas of Greek society and values: ideas of heroes, villains, Gods and Goddesses 

  • Old and Middle English literature; ideas and values of these societies: ideas of heroes and villains and Pilgrimage  

  • Shakespearean comic, romantic drama; ideas and values of Renaissance society: Love as the motivating force. The importance of scheming, plotting, deceit, trickery. Confusion in the middle scenes. The importance of characters achieving self-knowledge.  

  • Romantic literature and the ideas and values of this Literary period: a focus on the writer or narrator's emotions and inner world; celebration of nature, beauty, and imagination; rejection of industrialisation, organized religion, rationalism, and social convention; idealization of women, children, and rural life;  

 

This will enhance cultural capital because students will be given knowledge of the influences of the above periods together with content knowledge of the texts studied. These tests are influential to later periods and so provide appropriate experience and knowledge for our learners. 

Pupils will all have been exposed to: 

  • Shakespearean tragedy; ideas and values of Renaissance society and the inequality of female choice; the unusual nature of this Shakespearian tragedy and how it deviates from his other tragedies 

  • Victorian Literature and the inequality of class; ideas of extreme prejudice and Victorian superficial morality 

  • Dickens 

  • Modernism break with tradition-a strong reaction against established religious, political, and social views. 

  • Ideas of communism/anticommunism 

  • Orwell 

 

 

This will enhance cultural capital because students will be given knowledge of the above periods together with content knowledge of the texts studied.  

Pupils will all have been exposed to: 

  • Historical context of WW1 and its devastation of people and environments 

  • Social and historical context of The Great Depression in Californian dustbowl: itinerant workers; racism; ageism; sexism 

  • Shakespearean tragedy and the concept of the tragic hero; James 1st’s rule; witchcraft;  The Divine Right of Kings 

  • Modern refection on witchcraft 

  • Diverse texts 

  • Female authors 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This will enhance cultural capital because students will be given knowledge of the influences of the above periods together with content knowledge of the texts studied.  

Assessment: 
Formative – classwork and homework. 

Summative – end of cycle assessments and end of year examination. 

Pupils will have been assessed on: 

  • Reading 

  • Writing 

  • Spoken language 

By: 

  • Extract analysis of what has been read; questions are based on character, theme, context. 

  • TAP, SPaG, structure, vocabulary and accuracy when writing  

  • Discussion/presentation/Standard English 

  • Ongoing formative in class 

Pupils will have been assessed on: 

  • Reading 

  • Writing 

  • Spoken language 

By: 

  • Extract and comparison analysis of what has been read; questions are based on character, theme, context. 

  • TAP, SPaG, structure, vocabulary and accuracy when writing  

  • Discussion/presentation/Standard English 

  • Ongoing formative in class 

Pupils will have been assessed on: 

  • Reading 

  • Writing 

  • Spoken language 

By: 

  • Extract, whole text and comparison analysis of what has been read; questions are based on character, theme, context. 

  • TAP, SPaG, structure, vocabulary and accuracy when writing  

  • Discussion/presentation/Standard English 

  • Ongoing formative in class 

 

CURRICULUM PLAN: KEY STAGE 4 

 

Year 10 

Year 11 

Knowledge 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will know: 

  • Priestley’s An Inspector Calls 

  • Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde 

  • A range of fiction and non-fiction texts related to literature text studied 

 

We have chosen to teach this knowledge because of the opportunity to continue our exploration of our major concepts: 

  • Inequality 

  • Heroism  

  • Flawed Characters 

  • Conflict 

  • Love 

  • Female Voice 

  • Identity 

  • Faith 

 

Pupils will know: 

  • Shakespeare’s Macbeth 

  • Poetry of Power and Conflict 

  • A range of fiction and non-fiction text related to literature texts studied 

 

 

 

We have chosen to teach this because of the opportunity to continue our exploration of our major concepts: 

  • Flawed characters 

  • Heroism 

  • Conflict 

  • Inequality 

  • Identity 

  • Love  

  • Female Voice 

  • Faith 

  • Diversity 

Skills 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Read 

  • Write 

  • Use Spoken Language 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Read 

  • Write 

  • Use Spoken Language 

Cultural Capital 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to: 

  • Post war Literature and its concepts 

  • Victorian Literature and its concepts 

 

 

This will enhance cultural capital because students will be given knowledge of the influences of the above periods together with content knowledge of the texts studied. These texts are classics within our literary cannon. 

Pupils will all have been exposed to: 

  • Renaissance Literature and its concepts 

  • Poetry from a range of Literary periods and their concepts 

 

This will enhance cultural capital because students will be given knowledge of the influences of the above periods together with content knowledge of the texts studied. These are classics within our literary cannon. 

Assessment: 
Formative – classwork and homework. 

Summative – end of cycle assessments and end of year examination. 

Pupils will have been assessed on: 

  • Knowledge of texts’ content, context, structure, language and form 

  • Comparison skills 

  • SPaG 

  • Writing content, structure, use of language and the ability to adapt to audience and purpose 

  • Use of Spoken Language 

By 

  • Ongoing formative assessment in all lessons 

  • Summative assessments (refer to English Schedule of Assessment) which take the form of GCSE style tasks 

  • A spoken language presentation and discussion 

Pupils will have been assessed on: 

  • Knowledge of texts’ content, context, structure, language and form 

  • Comparison skills 

  • SPaG 

  • Writing content, structure, use of language and the ability to adapt to audience and purpose 

By 

  • Ongoing formative assessment in all lessons 

  • Summative assessments (refer to English Schedule of Assessment) which take the form of GCSE style tasks 

 

 

 

 

YEAR GROUP PLANS 

Year 7 

Cycle 1 

Cycle 2 

Cycle 3 

Cycle 4 

SPAG Recovery 

 

Pupils will know: 

  • Greek Myths and their contexts 

 

 

 

Non- Fiction 

  • Linked sources 

 

Pupils will be able to develop their reading accuracy (as outlined in the Curriculum Plan: KS3).   

 

Pupils will be able to:  

Develop their writing accuracy (as outlined Curriculum Plan: KS3).  

 

Pupils will be able to develop their speaking accuracy (as outlined Curriculum Plan: KS3). 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to our major concepts of: 

  • Heroism 

  • Origins  

  • Morality  

  • Pain 

  • Flawed characters 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to understand content, structure, language, form and content of range of Greek myths. 

 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to a write a range of TA for P 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to discuss, question, respond, debate, present ideas, use standard English. 

 

 

Pupils will know: 

  • Beowulf and its context 

  • Chaucer’ s The Canterbury Tales 

 

 

 

Non- Fiction 

  • Linked sources 

 

Pupils will be able to develop their reading accuracy (as outlined in the Curriculum Plan: KS3) .   

 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

Develop their writing accuracy (as outlined Curriculum Plan: KS3).   

 

 

Pupils will be able to develop their speaking accuracy (as outlined Curriculum Plan: KS3). 

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to our major concepts of: 

  • Flawed Characters 

  • Love 

  • Heroism 

  • Diversity 

 

 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to understand the content structure, language, form and content of a modern Beowulf. 

 

 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to write a range of TAP 

 

 

Students will be assessed on their ability to discuss, question, respond, debate, present ideas, use standard English. 

 

 

Pupils will know: 

  • Shakespeare's A Mid Summer Night's Dream and its context (to include conventions of comedy) 

 

Non-Fiction 

  • Linked sources 

 

Pupils will be able to develop their reading accuracy (as outlined in the Curriculum Plan: KS3).   

 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

Develop their writing accuracy (as outlined Curriculum Plan: KS3). 

 

 

Pupils will be able to develop their speaking accuracy (as outlined Curriculum Plan: KS3). 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to our major concepts of 

  • Love 

  • The Female Voice 

  • Conflict 

  • Morality 

  • Pain  

 

 

Students will be assessed on their ability to understand the structure, language form and content of an extract of A Midsummer Night’s Dream (dif-and whole text). 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to write a range of TA for P. 

 

Students will be assessed on their ability to discuss, question, respond, debate, present ideas, use standard English. 

 

 

Pupils will know: 

  • Coleridge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner 

 

 

 

Non-Fiction 

  • Linked sources 

 

Pupils will be able to develop their reading accuracy (as outlined in the Curriculum Plan: KS3).   

 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

Develop their writing accuracy (as outlined Curriculum Plan: KS3).   

 

 

Pupils will be able to develop their speaking accuracy (as outlined Curriculum Plan: KS3). 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to our major concepts of 

  • Conflict  

  • Pain 

  • Morality 

  • Flawed characters  

  • Faith 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to understand structure, language, form and content of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. 

 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to write a range of TA for P. 

 

Students will be assessed on their ability to discuss, question, respond, debate, present ideas, use standard English. 

Year 7 Literacy 

DL Reading Modes: 

  • Find meaning through literary techniques 

  • Recognise bias 

  • Use context to learn new vocabulary 

  • Summarise, analyse 

  • Comprehend how tone affects the text 

  • Make connections 

  • Recognise elements of poems, stories or novels 

 

DL Writing Modes: 

  • Utilise a process: drafting, revising, editing 

  • Ask for and utilise feedback 

  • Avoid formulaic writing 

  • Employ literary techniques and devices appropriately 

  • Use credible evidence 

  • Utilise mentor texts 

  • Adapt communication for various audiences 

 

DL Thinking Modes: 

  • Use reflection as a tool for understanding 

  • Ask questions of the text 

  • Use communication to clarify 

  • Make connections among texts 

  • Respect multiple viewpoints 

  • Listen to others 

C1 Key Terms: 

Myth - a traditional story, especially one concerning the early history of a people or explaining a natural or social phenomenon, and typically involving supernatural beings or events. 

Archetype – a typical example of​ 

Morality – ideas about right and wrong 

Heroism -great bravery 

Creation stories -stories that describe how worlds were created 

Empathy -being able to share and understand the feelings of others 

Narcissism – complete self-love 

Prophecy – a prediction of what will happen in the future 

Tantalising – to tease with the promise of something 

Destiny – events that will happen in the furture 

Implies – suggests something 

Presents - is shown like/as 

 

 

C2 Key Terms: 

Prowess - skill or expertise in a particular activity or field.  

Foe – enemy  

Awe – A feeling of respect or amazement.  

Woe - great sorrow or distress  

Renown - the condition of being known or talked about by many people (fame).  

Devout - having or showing deep religious feeling or commitment.  

Valiant - possessing or showing courage or determination.  

Courtesy - the showing of politeness in one's attitude and behaviour towards others  

Morality - ideas about right and wrong  

Colloquial – informal.  

Dialect - a particular form of a language which is peculiar to a specific region or social group.  

Courtly - very polite or refined, as befitting a royal court.  

 

C3 Key Terms: 

Love - an intense feeling of deep affection 

Conflict - a serious disagreement or argument or incompatible  

Greek mythology - the set of stories about the gods, goddesses, heroes and rituals of Ancient Greeks 

Classical literature - the great masterpieces of Greek, Roman, and other ancient civilizations 

Drama - a written work that tells a story through action and speech and is acted out 

Character - a person in a novel, play, or film 

Stage directions- an instruction written in the script of a play that gives direction to the actors or information about the scenery 

Dialogue - a conversation between two or more people as a feature of a book, play, or film 

Act – a section of a play/drama 

Scene – a sections of an act of a play/drama 

Comedy - a play characterized by its humorous or satirical tone and its depiction of amusing people or incidents, in which the characters ultimately triumph over adversity 

C4 Key Terms: 

Epic poem- a very long story poem about extraordinary events and characters 

Stanza – verse of a poem 

Romanticism – an 18th century movement in the arts and literature that emphasised nature, imagination, emotion and the individual. 

Flaw - having a fundamental weakness or imperfection 

Inner conflict - a constant battle inside that hinders us from making a smooth decision 

Faith - confidence in what we hope for and knowing that the lord is working 

Penance - punishment 

rebirth story – a story of change, renewal and transformation  

Voyage- long journey involving travel by sea 

Rebirth story – stories that tell of tell of change, renewal and transformation 

Coleridge – the Romantic writer of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner 

 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:  

  • Drama – Greek Theatre 

  • Art – Greek Heroism (Y7 C4) 

  • Maths -Pythagoras (spiralling) 

  • Science - Aristotle 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: 

  • History-Medieval Period/Anglo, Saxon, Norman Periods  

  • Art – Middle Ages 

  • MFL – Nature of Language Change 

  • RS – Pilgrimage and God’s Call 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: 

  • Art – Renaissance 

  • Drama – Scripts and Characterisation 

  • RS – Marriage 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: 

  • Art – Neoclassicalism 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by means relevant reading, writing tasks and revision tasks plus Tassomai online learning. 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by means relevant reading, writing tasks and revision tasks plus Tassomai online learning 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by means relevant reading, writing tasks and revision tasks plus Tassomai online learning. 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by means relevant reading, writing tasks and revision tasks plus Tassomai online learning. 

Sequencing 

We have chosen this method of sequencing in Year 7 because it adheres to chronology and helps give an understanding of the Literary Era concept together with the concept of language change.  We make links throughout the year via our major concepts and thereby deepen understanding of them. There is a progression of reading, writing and speaking and listening skills.  With this is mind, our starting place Greek origins moving onto old and middle English. We move through to renaissance to Romantic Literature.  During this journey and helped by our major concepts, we provide the basis for our curriculum intent which is to provide our students with the skills and knowledge to think about the different ways in which writers have explored what it means to be human, immersing our students in an exploration of literature from a broad range of different literary periods and exposing them to different voices by using a wide variety of imagined realities and real experiences in order to develop an appreciation of reading and writing. 

 

It builds on the work done in Year 6 by restoring focus on learning skills which our research, through collaborating with our primary feeder schools, demonstrates are not so stringently pursued once the KS2 SATs are completed; thus, our Greek Myths scheme focusing on reading and recapping key SPAG skills begins the year, culminating in a more challenging assessment more appropriate to KS3 than the KS2 test, which is heavily biased towards text level reading. Students consolidate these grammar skills before moving on to explore texts from the Canon and, at the start of Y8, other cultures.  We are also aware that parental involvement in students’ learning rapidly diminishes once students enter secondary school, hence the central role of reading in our school and English curriculum. Throughout the year, daily reading lessons ensure that this skill remains core in preparation for upper KS3 and KS4. Students, by way of contrast, are then introduced to a range of forms and techniques related this time to the production of transactional writing and non-fiction extracts linked to their schemes. The year concludes by expanding their cultural capital with active involvement with ‘The Rime of The Ancient Mariner.’ 

 

YEAR GROUP PLANS 8 

Year  

Cycle 1 

Cycle 2 

Cycle 3 

Cycle 4 

Pupils will know: 

Fiction: 

  • Poems from other cultures 

 

 

Non- Fiction 

  • Slave ship extract 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to develop their reading accuracy (as outlined in the Curriculum Plan:KS3).   

 

Pupils will be able to:  

Develop their writing accuracy (as outlined Curriculum Plan:KS3).  

 

Pupils will be able to develop their speaking accuracy (as outlined Curriculum Plan:KS3). 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to our major concepts of: 

  • Female Voice 

  • Flawed Characters 

  • Heroes 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to understand structure, language, form and content of a variety of feminist texts. 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to write a range of forms 

 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to use spoken language effectively. 

Pupils will know: 

Fiction: 

  • Dicken’s A Christmas Carol and its context (Yr 1 of roll out – Beowulf and its context) 

 

Non- Fiction 

 

 

Pupils will be able to develop their reading accuracy (as outlined in the Curriculum Plan:KS3).   

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to:  

Develop their writing accuracy (as outlined Curriculum Plan:KS3).  

 

 

Pupils will be able to develop their speaking accuracy (as outlined Curriculum Plan:KS3). 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to our major concepts of: 

  • Flawed Characters 

  • Conflict 

  • Identity 

  • Equality 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to understand structure, language, form and content of ‘A Christmas Carol’ 

 

 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to write transactional and narrative. 

 

 

Students will be assessed on their ability to use spoken language to use spoken language effectively. 

Pupils will know: 

Fiction: 

  • Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet and its context 

 

Non- Fiction 

  • Review of Shakespeare production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream 

 

Pupils will be able to develop their reading accuracy (as outlined in the Curriculum Plan:KS3).   

 

Pupils will be able to:  

Develop their writing accuracy (as outlined Curriculum Plan:KS3).  

 

Pupils will be able to develop their speaking accuracy (as outlined Curriculum Plan:KS3). 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to our major concepts of: 

  • Conflict 

  • Female voice 

  • Love 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to understand structure, language, form and content of ‘Romeo and Juliet’ 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to write transactional and narrative. 

 

Students will be assessed on their ability to use spoken language to use spoken language effectively. 

Pupils will know: 

Fiction: 

  • Orwell’s Animal Farm 

 

 

Non- Fiction 

  • Luther King’s I have a dream speech 

  • Lenin’s revolutionary speech 

 

 

Pupils will be able to develop their reading accuracy (as outlined in the Curriculum Plan:KS3).   

 

Pupils will be able to:  

Develop their writing accuracy (as outlined Curriculum Plan:KS3).  

 

Pupils will be able to develop their speaking accuracy (as outlined Curriculum Plan:KS3). 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to our major concepts of: 

  • Conflict 

  • Faith 

  • Flawed characters 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to understand structure, language, form and content of ‘Romeo and Juliet’ 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to write transactional and narrative. 

 

Students will be assessed on their ability to use spoken language to effectively. 

Year 8 Literacy 

DL Reading Modes: 

  • Find meaning through literary techniques 

  • Identify underlying messages that evolve as a theme 

  • Recognise bias 

  • Use context to learn new vocabulary 

  • Summarise, analyse, synthesis 

  • Comprehend how tone and foreshadowing affect the text 

  • Make connections 

  • Recognise elements of poems, stories or novels 

  • Understand perspective 

 

DL Writing Modes: 

  • Utilise a process: drafting, revising, editing 

  • Understand how to utilise organisation, details and elaboration 

  • Ask for and utilise feedback 

  • Avoid formulaic writing 

  • Employ literacy techniques and devices appropriately 

  • Use credible evidence 

  • Utilise mentor texts 

  • Adapt communication for various audiences 

 

DL Thinking Modes: 

  • Use reflection as a tool for understanding 

  • Ask questions of the text 

  • Use communication to clarify 

  • Make connections among texts and themes 

  • Respect multiple viewpoints 

  • Listen to others 

Key terms: 

Culture:  Ideas, customs, actions and beliefs of a particular group of people  

Heritage:  Range of inherited beliefs, traditions and culture taken from the past and continued. 

Oppression:  Cruel or unfair abuse of power by a more powerful group 

Hierarchy: A system that ranks/ arranges a group of people in order of importance and power 

Racism:  Prejudice and cruelty/ judgements based on skin colour or race 

Refrain:  Part of a song/ poem which is repeated regularly throughout 

Enjambment: continuing a sentence without a pause beyond the end of a line, couplet, or stanza. 

Diversity:  The range of human differences including: race, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion  

Rhythm: a repeated pattern of sound in poetry 

Extended Metaphor: a developed metaphor across several lines, stanzas or even the whole poem (metaphor is a comparison when something is something else) 

Key terms: 

Allegory - A story that can be interpreted to reveal a hidden meaning (usually political or moral) 

Avarice- Extreme greed for money/ wealth 

Workhouse- A public institution where the public received food and lodgings in exchange for hard labour. 

Morality tale -A story or narrative from which one can derive a moral about right and wrong 

Flawed – having a fundamental weakness or imperfection 

Phantom – another word for ghost 

Misanthropy - A hatred or dislike of humankind 

Flashback - A flashback is a scene that takes place before the story begins interrupting the chronological order 

Victorian period - Referring to the period when Queen Victoria was on the throne (1837-1901) 

Stave- A verse or stanza of a poem/ song 

 

Key terms: 

Female voice- how females are represented​ in Literature 

Forbidden Love - an intense feeling of deep affection that is not allowed 

Drama - a written work that tells a story through action and speech and is acted out 

Character - a person in a novel, play, or film 

Playscript- the manuscript of a play 

Patriarchy - a social system where men hold all the power 

Verona- a city in Italy in which the play is set 

Tragedy - play dealing with tragic events and having an unhappy ending 

Feuding – a conflict between groups of people 

Fate - events outside a person's control 

 

Key terms: 

Flawed characters - people with weaknesses or imperfections 

Communism - political order structured upon the ideas of common ownership 

Lenin - founder the Russian Communist Party  

Symbolism - use of symbols to represent ideas or qualities 

Allegory - a story, poem, or picture that can be interpreted to reveal a hidden meaning, typically a moral or political one 

Extended Metaphor: a developed metaphor across several lines, stanzas or even the whole poem (metaphor is a comparison when something is something else) 

Feuding – a conflict between groups of people 

Avarice - extreme greed for wealth or material gain. 

Hierarchy – a system where members are ranked according to status or authority 

Prose - ordinary language people use in speaking or writing 

 

Reading opportunities: 

Percy Jackson series 

Circe  (Madeline Miller) 

Mythos (Stephen Fry) 

Reading opportunities: 

Other novels by Dickens: Oliver Twist, David Copperfield. 

Great Expectations 

 

Reading opportunities: 

Other Shakespeare plays: Taming of the Shrew, Merchant of Venice 

Westside story. 

Reading opportunities: 

Dystopian fiction: 

1984 

Time machine 

Handmaid's Tale 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:  

  • RS- Sikhism, Buddhism, Islam and Hinduism; Samba and African Music 

  • Music – Musical Stories and Lyric Writing 

  • MFL – French and Spanish Culture 

  • History – Transatlantic slave trade (C4 Yr 8) 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: 

  • History – Victorian Part of Modern Period (Yr 9 C2 and 3) 

 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: 

  • RS – God’s Call and Vocation; Marriage 

  • History – The Elizabethans (Yr8 C1) 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: 

  • History – War Periods/Rise of Dictators (yr 9 C3 and 4 ) 

  • Art – Surrealism 

 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by means relevant reading, writing tasks and revision task plus Tassomai online learning. 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by means relevant reading, writing tasks and revision tasks plus Tassomai online learning. 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by means relevant reading, writing tasks and revision tasks plus Tassomai online learning. 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by means relevant reading, writing tasks and revision tasks plus Tassomai online learning. 

Sequencing: 

We have chosen this method of sequencing in Year 8 because it builds on the work done in Year 7 as it develops the concept of Literary Era .  We again make links throughout the year via our major concepts and thereby deepen the understanding of them that was created in year seven together with building in the new major concept in order to fulfil our curriculum intention. We open year 8 with the other cultures to enrich student knowledge of cultural diversity and reflect on a lack of balance in early literature.     C2 provides experience of the Victorian era and develops the major concepts as defined here; it is an apt time to study A Christmas Carol and reflects the lack of cultural diversity in Literature of this period.  We move onto Shakespeare’s, Romeo and Juliet with its Key theme of love to contrast to the flawed character of Scrooge who needs desperately to be taught this concept. During C3, all students are taught a Shakespeare play with the intention that this commonality will heighten the impact of the cultural capital gained by studying these texts. Finally, Animal Farm continues to build on ideas of inequality experienced during C3 and picks up the destructive nature of feuding to the human condition presented in Romeo and Juliet. During this journey and helped by our major concepts, we provide the basis for our curriculum intent which is to provide our students with the skills and knowledge to think about the different ways in which writers have explored what it means to be human, immersing our students in an exploration of literature from a broad range of different literary periods and to exposing them to different voices by using a wide variety of imagined realities and real experiences in order to develop an appreciation of reading and writing. 

 

It leads to the work that will be done in 8 year by establishing and developing understanding of our major concepts and developing reading, writing and speaking and listening skills. 

 

YEAR GROUP PLANS 9 

Year  

Cycle 1 

Cycle 2 

Cycle 3 

Cycle 4 

Pupils will know: 

Fiction 

  • WW1 Literature and its context 

Non-Fiction 

  • WW1 battlefield description 

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to our major concepts of: 

  • Heroism 

  • Conflict 

  • Equality 

 

 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to analyse structure, language, form and content of WW1 Poetry 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to write a range of forms for audience and purpose 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to use spoken language effectively. 

Pupils will know: 

Fiction 

  • Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men and its context 

Non- Fiction 

  • The Great Depression newspaper articles contemporary and in review 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to our major concepts of: 

  • Identity 

  • Equality 

  • Conflict 

  • Pain 

 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to analyse structure, language, form and content of ‘OMAM’ 

 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to write forms for audience and purpose 

 

Students will be assessed on their ability to use spoken language effectively. 

Pupils will know: 

Fiction 

  • Shakespeare’s Macbeth and its context 

Non- Fiction 

  • Witch/witchcraft reporting 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to our major concepts of: 

  • Heroism 

  • Conflict 

  • Flawed characters 

  • Female voice 

 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to analyse structure, language, form and content of ‘Macbeth’ 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to write a range of forms for audience and purpose 

 

Students will be assessed on their ability to use spoken language effectively. 

Pupils will know: 

Fiction 

  • Modern Novel 

Blackman’s Noughts and Crosses 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to our major concepts of: 

  • Female voice 

  • Flawed characters 

  • Identity 

  • Equality 

  • Conflict 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to analyse structure, language, form and content of ‘Noughts and Crosses’  

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to write  a range of forms for audience and purpose 

 

Students will be assessed on their ability to use spoken language effectively. 

Literacy 

DL Reading Modes: 

  • Find meaning through literary techniques 

  • Identify underlying messages that evolve as a theme 

  • Recognise bias 

  • Use context to learn new vocabulary 

  • Summarise, analyse, synthesis and evaluate o 

  • Comprehend how tone, foreshadowing or irony affect the text 

  • Make connections 

  • Pay attention to the craft of writing 

  • Recognise elements of poems, stories or novels 

  • Understand perspective 

  •  

DL Writing Modes: 

  • Utilise a process: drafting, revising, editing 

  • Understand how to utilise organisation, details, elaboration and voice to enhance meaning 

  • Ask for and utilise feedback 

  • Avoid formulaic writing 

  • Avoid bias when appropriate 

  • Employ various perspectives 

  • Employ literacy techniques and devices appropriately 

  • Use credible evidence 

  • Utilise mentor texts 

  • Adapt communication for various audiences 

  • Employ various techniques for augmentation 

 

DL Thinking Modes: 

  • Use reflection as a tool for understanding 

  • Ask questions of the text or themes 

  • Use communication to clarify 

  • Make connections among texts, themes and the real world 

  • Respect multiple viewpoints 

  • Listen to others 

  • Compare texts, sources and perspectives 

Key terms: 

Hierarchy – a ranking system based on power 
Futility – pointlessness 
Propaganda – misleading information promoting a political cause 
Conscription – mandatory enlistment 
Cowardice – the opposite of bravery 
Pain- mental or physical suffering 
Shell-shock – PTSD suffered by soldiers in WW1 
Refrain – a repeated chorus in a poem 
Sibilance – repeated ‘s’ sound creating harshness, hissing or the sound of breathing 
Symbolism – ideas or qualities represented in symbols 

 

 

Key terms: 

Euthanasia – a mercy killing 

Flawed characters - people with weaknesses or imperfections​  

Foreshadowing – a warning of future events 

Zoomorphism – animal like descriptions 

Conflict- war, argument, disagreement 

The Great Depression - a worldwide economic depression during the 1930s  

The Dust-Bowl – a drought stricken area of the Mid-western USA during the 1930s  

Female Voice​ - how females are represented​ in Literature 

Equality​ - being equal/the same​  

Key terms: 

Tyrant - a  ruler who is harsh and cruel  

Regicide -killing the king or Queen  

Hubris -excessive pride 

Manipulative -influencing or persuading someone   

Supernatural -something that is unnatural or cannot be explained   

Tragic hero -a heroic character who has a flaw which leads to their downfall  

Soliloquy - when a character speaks their thoughts and feelings aloud and only the audience can hear what is being said   

Foreshadow - a warning about a future event 

Juxtaposition - two opposite objects, images, or ideas that are placed together or described together   

Ambition  - a strong desire to do or achieve something 

Flaw characters - people with weaknesses or imperfections​  

Key terms: 

Prose - ordinary language people use in speaking or writing 

Racism- discrimination on the basis of race 

Identity – the sense of self 

Symbolism – ideas or qualities represented in symbols 

Segregation –   setting someone or something apart from others 

Forbidden Love - an intense feeling of deep affection that is not allowed 

Motif – a repeated image or idea 

Discrimination – unjust or prejudicial treatment of different categories of people, especially on the grounds of race, age, sex, or disability 

Allegory - a story, poem, or picture that can be interpreted to reveal a hidden meaning, typically a moral or political one. 

Civil Right Movement - a struggle for social justice that took place mainly during the 1950s and 1960s for Black Americans to gain equal rights under the law in the United States 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:  

  • Art – WW1 and rejecting values 

  • RS – Philosophy and Ethics of Suffering 

  • Drama- Improvisation inspired by WW1 Sounds 

  • History – British Empire (Yr 8 C4) 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: 

  • PE – Notions of equality 

  • PSHE – Domestic Abuse, Positive Relationships (Yr 7 Spring term) Damaging Stereotypes 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: 

  • RS – Church History 

  • Drama – ‘Unsex me here ‘ soliloquy of Lady Macbeth and its language and themes; Greek tragedy 

  • History – The Elizabethans (Yr 9 C2) 

  • Medieval Kingship (Yr 7 term 4) 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: 

  • PE –Gender Equality 

  • Art – Post Modern Female Artists 

  • RS – Gender Discrimination and Gender Equality in Families 

  • MFL – Positive Female Role Models 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by means relevant reading, writing tasks and revision tasks plus Tassomai online learning. 

 Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by means relevant reading, writing tasks and revision tasks plus Tassomai online learning. 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by means relevant reading, writing tasks and revision tasks plus Tassomai online learning. 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by means relevant reading, writing tasks and revision tasks plus Tassomai online learning. 

Sequencing 

We have chosen this method of sequencing in Year 9 because it builds on work done in Year 8 to extend knowledge of our major concepts.  We are developing understanding of our major concepts and therefore deepening student understanding of these whilst working towards fulfilling our curriculum intent and exploring what it is to be human. Furthermore, reading, writing and speaking and listening skill are building on year 8’s work and progressing skills further. The idea of conflict studied in C4, year 8’s Animal Farm unit is picked up with powerful force and the realities of WW1 in C1 of year 9.  This conflict is continued with the study of Steinbeck’s of Mice and Men,  then Macbeth and the female voice through a selection of extracts from the literary canon with many examples of conflict being explored.  During this journey and helped by our major concepts, we provide the basis for our curriculum intent which is to provide our students with the skills and knowledge to think about the different ways in which writers have explored what it means to be human, immersing our students in an exploration of literature from a broad range of different literary periods and to exposing them to different voices by using a wide variety of imagined realities and real experiences in order to develop an appreciation of reading and writing. 

It leads to the work that will be done in 10 year by developing understanding of our major concepts and developing reading, writing and speaking and listening skills in preparation for the requirement GCSE content and skills. 

 

 

YEAR GROUP PLANS 10 

Year  

Cycle 1 

Cycle 2 

Cycle 3 

Cycle 4 

Pupils will know: 

  • Priestley’s An Inspector Calls  

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

• Identify and interpret explicit and implicit information and ideas. 

 • Select and synthesise evidence from different texts. 

• Explain, comment on and analyse how writers use language and structure to achieve effects and influence readers, using relevant subject terminology to support their views 

• Compare writers’ ideas and perspectives, as well as how these are conveyed, across two or more texts. 

Show understanding of the relationships between texts and the contexts in which they were written. 

• Communicate clearly, effectively and imaginatively, selecting and adapting tone, style and register for different forms, purposes and audiences.  

• Organise information and ideas, using structural and grammatical features to support coherence and cohesion of texts 

• use a range of vocabulary and sentence structures for clarity, purpose and effect, with accurate spelling and punctuation. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to  

our major concepts of: 

  • Flawed characters 

  • Conflict 

  • Equality 

  • Female voice 

  • Heroism 

 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to read and analyse structure, language, form and content of An Inspector Calls and their ability to write description. They will be assessed on their ability to give a Spoken Language presentation. 

 

 

 

They will be assessed by AQA exam style questions. 

Pupils will know: 

  • How to answer GCSE Language Papers 1 and 2 

 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

• Identify and interpret explicit and implicit information and ideas. 

 • Select and synthesise evidence from different texts. 

• Explain, comment on and analyse how writers use language and structure to achieve effects and influence readers, using relevant subject terminology to support their views 

• Compare writers’ ideas and perspectives, as well as how these are conveyed, across two or more texts. 

Show understanding of the relationships between texts and the contexts in which they were written. 

• Communicate clearly, effectively and imaginatively, selecting and adapting tone, style and register for different forms, purposes and audiences.  

• Organise information and ideas, using structural and grammatical features to support coherence and cohesion of texts 

• use a range of vocabulary and sentence structures for clarity, purpose and effect, with accurate spelling and punctuation. 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to our major concepts pertaining to sources choosing for particular groups and students 

 

 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to read and analyse structure, language, form and content of  fiction and non-fiction extracts and  to write to narrate and argue.  

 

They will be assessed by AQA exam style questions. 

Pupils will know: 

  • Stevenson’s The Strange case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde 

 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

• Identify and interpret explicit and implicit information and ideas. 

 • Select and synthesise evidence from different texts. 

• Explain, comment on and analyse how writers use language and structure to achieve effects and influence readers, using relevant subject terminology to support their views 

• Compare writers’ ideas and perspectives, as well as how these are conveyed, across two or more texts. 

Show understanding of the relationships between texts and the contexts in which they were written. 

• Communicate clearly, effectively and imaginatively, selecting and adapting tone, style and register for different forms, purposes and audiences.  

• Organise information and ideas, using structural and grammatical features to support coherence and cohesion of texts 

• use a range of vocabulary and sentence structures for clarity, purpose and effect, with accurate spelling and punctuation. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to our major concepts of: 

  • Identity 

  • Flawed characters 

  • Conflict 

  • Faith 

 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to read and analyse structure, language, form and content The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde and their ability to write analytically.  

 

 

 

They will be assessed by AQA exam style questions. 

Pupils will know: 

  • Power and Conflict poems 

  • How to study unseen poems 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

• Identify and interpret explicit and implicit information and ideas. 

 • Select and synthesise evidence from different texts. 

• Explain, comment on and analyse how writers use language and structure to achieve effects and influence readers, using relevant subject terminology to support their views 

• Compare writers’ ideas and perspectives, as well as how these are conveyed, across two or more texts. 

Show understanding of the relationships between texts and the contexts in which they were written. 

• Communicate clearly, effectively and imaginatively, selecting and adapting tone, style and register for different forms, purposes and audiences.  

• Organise information and ideas, using structural and grammatical features to support coherence and cohesion of texts 

• use a range of vocabulary and sentence structures for clarity, purpose and effect, with accurate spelling and punctuation. 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to our major concepts of: 

  • Identity 

  • Conflict 

  • Equality 

  • Female voice 

  • Heroism 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to read and analyse structure, language, form and content of  Power and Conflict poems and their ability to write to argue.  

 

 

 

They will be assessed by AQA style questions. 

Literacy 

DL Reading Modes: 

  • Find meaning through literary techniques 

  • Identify underlying messages that evolve as a theme 

  • Recognise bias 

  • Use context to learn new vocabulary 

  • Summarise, analyse, synthesis and evaluate o 

  • Comprehend how tone, foreshadowing or irony affect the text 

  • Make connections 

  • Pay attention to the craft of writing 

  • Recognise elements of poems, stories or novels 

  • Understand perspective 

 

DL Writing Modes: 

  • Utilise a process: drafting, revising, editing 

  • Understand how to utilise organisation, details, elaboration and voice to enhance meaning 

  • Ask for and utilise feedback 

  • Avoid formulaic writing 

  • Avoid bias when appropriate 

  • Employ various perspectives 

  • Employ literacy techniques and devices appropriately 

  • Use credible evidence 

  • Utilise mentor texts 

  • Adapt communication for various audiences 

  • Employ various techniques for augmentation 

 

DL Thinking Modes: 

  • Use reflection as a tool for understanding 

  • Ask questions of the text or themes 

  • Use communication to clarify 

  • Make connections among texts, themes and the real world 

  • Respect multiple viewpoints 

  • Listen to others 

  • Compare texts, sources and perspectives 

Key terms: 

Patriarchy – a social system where men hold all the power. 

Hierarchy – a system where members are ranked according to status or authority. 

Empathy – The ability to understand and share the feelings of another. 

Inequality – Where people are not treated the same or correctly. 

Misogyny – Ingrained dislike or contempt of women. 

Feminism – The belief that all genders are equal. 

Capitalism – The belief that profit matters more than lives. 

Socialism – The belief that lives matter more than money. 

Revolution – Going against the normal system. 

Allegory – A representation of a wider problem. 

 

Key terms: 

Compare – make links between texts of their similarities and differences 

Viewpoints – opinions and ideas 

Attitudes - way of thinking or feeling about something 

Reflect – show  

Structure – the organization of a text 

Language – the words, phrases and features of a text 

Extent – the amount 

Summarise – write the main points of a text 

Synthesise – bring together the ideas in a text 

Fiction – creative texts 

Non – Fiction - informative or factual texts 

 

 

Key terms: 

Gothic- Something that is characterised by mystery, horror and gloom.  

Dual- having two parts  

Evil - immoral and wicked  

Foreshadow- a warning about a future event.  

Repress- hold in certain thoughts and feelings that you don’t want to think about.  

Pathetic fallacy - when nature is used to reflect human emotions  

Savage - violent and animalistic  

Hypocrisy - a situation in which someone pretends to believe something that they do not really believe or that is the opposite of what they do or say at another time.  

Flawed characters - a character with a fault.  

Supernatural- an event or thing that cannot be explained by Science or nature  

Inner conflict – a constant battle inside that hinders us from making a smooth decision 

Identity – the sense of self 

Key terms: 

Speaker- the voice in the poem 

Romanticism – an 18th century movement in the arts and literature that emphasised nature, imagination, emotion and the individual 

Identity – the sense of self 

Conflict – a serious disagreement or argument or incompatible 

Power – the capacity or ability to direct or influence the behaviour of others or the course of events 

Heroism – great bravery 

Stanza- the verse in a poem 

Dramatic monologue – a poem written in the form of a speech of an individual character 

Poetic structure – the organisation of a poem 

Trauma - an emotional response to a terrible event 

 

 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:  

  • Geography – Inequality  

  • MFL – Inequality of Wealth  

  • RS – Parable of the Sower 

  • PSHE - Families 

 

 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: 

  • Drama – Articulacy 

  • MFL – Literary Extract Study 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: 

  • History – Medicine (Yr 11 term 1); Industrial Revolution and Crime (Yr 9 C2) 

  • Geography – Urbanisation (Yr 10 C2) 

  • PSHE – Drugs and Consequences of Addiction 

  • Science – Darwin’s Theory of Evolution; Conventional Science 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: 

  • WW1 (Yr9 C3) 

  • WW2 (Yr 9 C4) 

  • Industrial Revolution (Yr 9 C1) 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by means relevant reading, writing tasks and revision tasks plus Tassomai online learning. 

 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by means relevant reading, writing tasks and revision tasks plus Tassomai online learning. 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by means relevant reading, writing tasks and revision tasks plus Tassomai online learning. 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by means relevant reading, writing tasks and revision tasks plus Tassomai online learning. 

Sequencing 

We have chosen this method of sequencing in Year 10 starting with AIC as a text which has proven to engage students at the start of their GCSE study. We then desire to provide a thorough grounding for the Language GCSE, bringing together understanding gained during KS3’s study of fiction and non- fiction extracts and the broad range of writing styles explored then. Links will be made both from the Victorians extracts studied in C2 and the Dickens and Victorian extracts studied in KS 3 in C3 when Stevenson’s Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde is studied.  Finally, the study of Power and Conflict poems can make links to the pre WW1 period, also studied in year 9, of AIC and societal attitudes at this time; understanding of Victorian attitudes and style are again developed; understanding established of the philosophy of Romantic writers established in years 7 and 8 is developed. The C4 unit ends year 10 by bringing togethers ideas, contexts and styles of that studied across the year and in years 7, 8 and 9. During this journey and helped by our major concepts, we provide the basis for our curriculum intent which is to provide our students with the skills and knowledge to think about the different ways in which writers have explored what it means to be human, immersing our students in an exploration of literature from a broad range of different literary periods and to exposing them to different voices by using a wide variety of imagined realities and real experiences in order to develop an appreciation of reading and writing. 

 

It builds on the work done in years 7, 8 and 9 because of the links made to our major concepts explored in key stage 3 and the progression of reading, writing skills and speaking and listening skills made there. 

 

It leads to the work that will be done in Year 11 by preparing for the more detailed study of Literature texts and the Language work done in this year.  

 

YEAR GROUP PLANS 11 

Year  

Cycle 1 

Cycle 2 

Cycle 3 

Cycle 4 

Pupils will know: 

  • Shakespeare’s Macbeth in greater detail 

  • How to answer Language Paper 2 with more assurance 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

• Identify and interpret explicit and implicit information and ideas. 

 • Select and synthesise evidence from different texts. 

• Explain, comment on and analyse how writers use language and structure to achieve effects and influence readers, using relevant subject terminology to support their views 

• Compare writers’ ideas and perspectives, as well as how these are conveyed, across two or more texts. 

Show understanding of the relationships between texts and the contexts in which they were written. 

• Communicate clearly, effectively and imaginatively, selecting and adapting tone, style and register for different forms, purposes and audiences.  

• Organise information and ideas, using structural and grammatical features to support coherence and cohesion of texts 

• use a range of vocabulary and sentence structures for clarity, purpose and effect, with accurate spelling and punctuation. 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to  

our major concepts of: 

  • Flawed characters 

  • Conflict 

  • Equality 

  • Female voice 

  • Heroism 

 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to read and analyse structure, language, form and content of Macbeth and their ability to write description. 

 

 

They will be assessed by AQA exam style questions. 

Pupils will know: 

  • The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde in greater detail 

  • How to answer Language Paper 1 with more assurance 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Identify and interpret explicit and implicit information and ideas. 

 • Select and synthesise evidence from different texts. 

• Explain, comment on and analyse how writers use language and structure to achieve effects and influence readers, using relevant subject terminology to support their views 

• Compare writers’ ideas and perspectives, as well as how these are conveyed, across two or more texts. 

Show understanding of the relationships between texts and the contexts in which they were written. 

• Communicate clearly, effectively and imaginatively, selecting and adapting tone, style and register for different forms, purposes and audiences.  

• Organise information and ideas, using structural and grammatical features to support coherence and cohesion of texts 

• use a range of vocabulary and sentence structures for clarity, purpose and effect, with accurate spelling and punctuation. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to  

our major concepts of: 

  • Flawed characters 

  • Conflict 

  • Identity 

 

 

 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to read and analyse structure, language, form and content of all set text when answering in PPE exams 

 

 

 

They will be assessed by AQA exam style questions. 

 

Pupils will know: 

  • An Inspector Calls in Greater detail. 

  • Fill knowledge and skills gaps for Language GCSE 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils will be able to:

  • Identify and interpret explicit and implicit information and ideas. 

 • Select and synthesise evidence from different texts. 

• Explain, comment on and analyse how writers use language and structure to achieve effects and influence readers, using relevant subject terminology to support their views 

• Compare writers’ ideas and perspectives, as well as how these are conveyed, across two or more texts. 

Show understanding of the relationships between texts and the contexts in which they were written. 

• Communicate clearly, effectively and imaginatively, selecting and adapting tone, style and register for different forms, purposes and audiences.  

• Organise information and ideas, using structural and grammatical features to support coherence and cohesion of texts 

• use a range of vocabulary and sentence structures for clarity, purpose and effect, with accurate spelling and punctuation. 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to  

our major concepts of: 

  • Flawed characters 

  • Conflict 

  • Equality 

  • Female voice 

  • Love  

  • Pain 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to read and analyse structure, language, form and content of An Inspector Calls and their ability to write to argue. 

 

 

They will be assessed by AQA exam style questions. 

Pupils will know: 

  • Power and Conflict poems in greater detail 

  • Secure how to study unseen poems 

  • Fill knowledge and skills gaps for all English GCSE and exam technique 

 

Pupils will be able to: 

  • Identify and interpret explicit and implicit information and ideas. 

 • Select and synthesise evidence from different texts. 

• Explain, comment on and analyse how writers use language and structure to achieve effects and influence readers, using relevant subject terminology to support their views 

• Compare writers’ ideas and perspectives, as well as how these are conveyed, across two or more texts. 

Show understanding of the relationships between texts and the contexts in which they were written. 

• Communicate clearly, effectively and imaginatively, selecting and adapting tone, style and register for different forms, purposes and audiences.  

• Organise information and ideas, using structural and grammatical features to support coherence and cohesion of texts 

• use a range of vocabulary and sentence structures for clarity, purpose and effect, with accurate spelling and punctuation. 

 

Pupils will all have been exposed to  

our major concepts of: 

  • Flawed characters 

  • Conflict 

  • Equality 

  • Female voice 

  • Heroism 

 

 

Students will have been assessed on their ability to read and analyse structure, language, form and content of An Inspector Calls and their ability to write to argue and describe.  

 

They will be assessed by AQA exam style questions. 

Literacy 

DL Reading Modes: 

  • Find meaning through literary techniques 

  • Identify underlying messages that evolve as a theme 

  • Recognise bias 

  • Use context to learn new vocabulary 

  • Summarise, analyse, synthesis and evaluate o 

  • Comprehend how tone, foreshadowing or irony affect the text 

  • Make connections 

  • Pay attention to the craft of writing 

  • Recognise elements of poems, stories or novels 

  • Understand perspective 

 

DL Writing Modes: 

  • Utilise a process: drafting, revising, editing 

  • Understand how to utilise organisation, details, elaboration and voice to enhance meaning 

  • Ask for and utilise feedback 

  • Avoid formulaic writing 

  • Avoid bias when appropriate 

  • Employ various perspectives 

  • Employ literacy techniques and devices appropriately 

  • Use credible evidence 

  • Utilise mentor texts 

  • Adapt communication for various audiences 

  • Employ various techniques for augmentation 

 

DL Thinking Modes: 

  • Use reflection as a tool for understanding 

  • Ask questions of the text or themes 

  • Use communication to clarify 

  • Make connections among texts, themes and the real world 

  • Respect multiple viewpoints 

  • Listen to others 

  • Compare texts, sources and perspectives 

Key terms: 

Tyrant - a  ruler who is harsh and cruel  

Regicide -killing the king or Queen  

Hubris -excessive pride 

Manipulative -influencing or persuading someone   

Supernatural -something that is unnatural or cannot be explained   

Tragic hero -a heroic character who has a flaw which leads to their downfall  

Soliloquy - when a character speaks their thoughts and feelings aloud and only the audience can hear what is being said   

Foreshadow - a warning about a future event 

Juxtaposition - two opposite objects, images, or ideas that are placed together or described together   

Ambition  - a strong desire to do or achieve something 

 

Key terms: 

Gothic- Something that is characterised by mystery, horror and gloom.  

Dual- having two parts  

Evil - immoral and wicked  

Foreshadow- a warning about a future event.  

Repress- hold in certain thoughts and feelings that you don’t want to think about.  

Pathetic fallacy - when nature is used to reflect human emotions  

Savage - violent and animalistic  

Hypocrisy - a situation in which someone pretends to believe something that they do not really believe or that is the opposite of what they do or say at another time.  

Flawed characters - a character with a fault.  

Supernatural- an event or thing that cannot be explained by Science or nature  

Inner conflict – a constant battle inside that hinders us from making a smooth decision 

Identity – the sense of self 

 

Key terms: 

Patriarchy – a social system where men hold all the power. 

Hierarchy – a system where members are ranked according to status or authority. 

Empathy – The ability to understand and share the feelings of another. 

Inequality – Where people are not treated the same or correctly. 

Feminism – The belief that all genders are equal. 

Capitalism – The belief that profit matters more than lives. 

Socialism – The belief that lives matter more than money. 

Revolution – Going against the normal system. 

Allegory – A representation of a wider problem. 

Pain – mental or physical suffering 

 

Key terms: 

Speaker- the voice in the poem 

Romanticism – an 18th century movement in the arts and literature that emphasised nature, imagination, emotion and the individual 

Identity – the sense of self 

Conflict – a serious disagreement or argument or incompatible 

Power – the capacity or ability to direct or influence the behaviour of others or the course of events 

Heroism –  great bravery 

Stanza- the verse in a poem 

Dramatic monologue – a poem written in the form of a speech of an individual character 

Poetic structure – the organisation of a poem 

Trauma - an emotional response to a terrible event 

 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas:  

  • RS – Church History 

  • Drama – ‘Unsex me here ‘ soliloquy of Lady Macbeth and its language and themes; Greek tragedy 

  • History – The Elizabethans 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: 

  • History – Medicine; Industrial Revolution and Crime (Y2 9 C2) 

  • Geography – Urbanisation (Yr 8 Term 4) 

  • PSHE – Drugs and Consequences of Addiction 

  • Science – Darwin’s Theory of Evolution; Conventional Science 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: 

  • Geography – Inequality  

  • MFL – Inequality of Wealth  

  • RS – Parable of the Sower 

  • PSHE - Families 

 

 

Connections 

We have identified these connections to other subject areas: 

  • History – War Periods (Yr 9 C3) 

  • Music – Musical Stories and Lyric Writing 

  • PSHE - Families 

 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by means relevant reading, writing tasks and revision tasks plus Tassomai online learning. 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by means relevant reading, writing tasks and revision tasks plus Tassomai online learning 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by means relevant reading, writing tasks and revision tasks plus Tassomai online learning 

Learning at home 

Consolidation of learning will take place at home by means relevant reading, writing tasks and revision tasks plus Tassomai online learning 

Sequencing 

We have chosen this method of sequencing in Year 11 because it concludes the study of our major concepts and has provided our students with the skills and knowledge to think about the different ways in which writers have explored what it means to be human. Furthermore, it thoroughly prepares students for external exams- the success in which helps to define their futures. 

 

Our Mission and Values

“Therefore learn as if to live forever; live as if to die tomorrow” (St Edmund of Abingdon)

Read Our Values & Ethos Statement

Trust Information

St Edmund's Catholic School is an academy, and part of the Kent Catholic Schools’ Partnership. The Kent Catholic Schools’ Partnership is an exempt charity and a company limited by guarantee registered in England and Wales under company registration number 08176019 at registered address: Barham Court, Teston, Maidstone, Kent, ME18 5BZ. St Edmund's Catholic School is a business name of Kent Catholic Schools’ Partnership.

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